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Dr. David Suzuki Tells Bill Moyers Why It's Time to Get Real on Climate Change

Climate

In the foreword of The Legacy, one of Dr. David Suzuki's many books, Canadian author and environmentalist Margaret Atwood writes that Suzuki, like great prophets, provides "messages that go unheeded because they tell us things we find so uncomfortable."

Suzuki was back at it Friday, sparing no discomfort during an appearance on the Moyers & Company TV show. He's never been afraid to call out his Canadian government and its tar sands development practices, and that didn't change during this 25-minute conversation.

“Our politicians should be thrown in the slammer for willful blindness," the scientist, author and philanthropist said. "I think that we are being willfully blind to the consequences for our children and grandchildren.

"It’s an intergenerational crime."

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