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Don’t Forget the Ocean on Earth Day

Don’t Forget the Ocean on Earth Day

As you celebrate Earth Day, don’t forget that over 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is under the ocean—it makes up 99 percent of the living space on our planet, and is home to half of all species on Earth! More than 2.6 billion people depend on the ocean as their primary source for protein.

Even if your home is landlocked and you don’t eat fish, the ocean is a key part of your life. Did you know that half of all the oxygen in the atmosphere comes from the ocean? The ocean is so important to us; please join me in celebrating it. And share the ocean love by sending an Earth Day ecard to your friends.

With serious threats from plastic pollution to ocean acidification facing this vital resource, Earth Day is also a great time to take action to protect the ocean.

You can write to your representative in Congress urging him or her to expand funding for ocean acidification research. By carrying a reusable bag, you can ensure a plastic bag never reaches a beach where sea turtles nest. Eat responsibly and locally caught seafood to satisfy your sushi craving. When you’re filling your boat’s gas tank, fill up only 90 percent of it. This will reduce the risk of spills from overfilling.

Other easy ways to protect the ocean:

  • Carry a reusable mug.
  • Print double-sided documents.
  • Use cold water to reduce energy and your utility bills.
  • Use a drying rack for your clothes.
  • Use cloth napkins.

As you plant a tree or stroll through a forest, please remember that so much of what we call home lies beneath the waves.

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