Quantcast

Donald Trump Blasts GOP Rivals at Koch Summit as ‘Puppets’

Politics

Loud-mouthed Donald Trump is more of a walking punchline than a viable presidential candidate, so it comes as a surprise to find myself actually agreeing with the current Republican front-runner:

Five GOP presidential candidates—former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina—flocked to Charles and David Koch's donor conference, Aug. 1-3, in Dana Point, California, a gathering of 450 top Republican party donors.

This network of conservative mega-donors, or the Freedom Partners Chamber of Commerce, aims to spend a jaw-dropping $889 million for the presidential election, according to the Washington Post.

Seven sitting governors, six incumbent senators and two House members from the Republican party (including the aforementioned White House candidates) were extended an invite to the conference. Trump was not.

As EcoWatch previously pointed out, while the climate-denying mogul would be a perfect candidate for the Kochs, the deep-pocketed brothers have denied the Donald "access to their state-of-the-art data and refusing to let him speak to their gatherings of grassroots activists or major donors," Politico reported.

While many candidates in the crowded Republican field have taken this climate-denying mantle, on Sunday at the Freedom Partners forum, Sen. Cruz repeated his belief that “the data and facts don’t support” that global warming is occurring, the Guardian reported.

Cruz also criticized the Obama administration's latest clean power plan and also described how liberals use global warming to impose “massive government control” on the economy.

Bush also had harsh words for President Obama's new power plant regulations (surely in an effort to please the fossil fuel barons in the audience).

“I think it’s a disaster. It’s typical of the Obama administration, taking the power he doesn’t have,” Bush said, adding that the regulations were both “unconstitutional” and “a job killer.”

It appears that the candidates were well-received by the affluent attendees. "The Texas senator and the former Florida governor drew the most applause among the five Republicans who took the stage," Bloomberg reported from the event.

(No) thanks to the Supreme Court's Citizens United ruling that approved unrestricted campaign spending by corporations, a crop of billionaires and their super PACs have held unwieldy influence on the state of U.S. politics. Politico reported: “The 67 biggest donors, each of whom gave $1 million or more, donated more than three times as much as the 508,000 smallest donors combined."

Meanwhile at a town hall meeting in Rollinsford, New Hampshire, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders called the current campaign finance system a “sad state of affairs” and announced a new bill to "cripple the Kochs and right-wing billionaires by providing public funding for elections," PoliticsUSA reported.

“We’re going to introduce legislation which will allow people to run for office without having to beg money from the wealthy and the powerful,” the Vermont senator said.

Sanders has pledged not to accept super PAC money and is running his momentum-gathering campaign on small donations. “We must overturn [Citizens United] before it’s too late,” he added. “We are increasingly living in an oligarchy where big money is buying politicians.”

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Jimmy Carter: The U.S. Is an ‘Oligarchy With Unlimited Political Bribery’

6 Governors Who Refuse to Comply With Obama’s Clean Power Plan

Hillary’s Horror Video Bashes GOP Climate Deniers

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Six Extinction Rebellion protesters were arrested as they blocked off corporations in the UK. The group had increased their actions to week-long nationwide protests.

Read More Show Less
Sari Goodfriend

By Courtney Lindwall

Across the world, tens of thousands of young people are taking to the streets to protest climate inaction. And at the historic Apollo Theater in Harlem last month, more than a dozen of them took to the stage.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
Pumpjacks on Lost Hills Oil Field in California. Arne Hückelheim, Wikimedia Commons

By Julia Conley

A national conservation group revealed Wednesday that President Donald Trump's drilling leases on public lands could lead to the release of more carbon emissions than the European Union contributes in an entire year.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Marlene Cimons

For nearly a century, scientists thought that malaria could only spread in places where it is really hot. That's because malaria is spread by a tiny parasite that infects mosquitoes, which then infect humans — and this parasite loves warm weather. In warmer climates, the parasite grows quickly inside the mosquito's body. But in cooler climates, the parasite develops so slowly that the mosquito will die before the it is fully grown.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii, which is considered sacred by some Native Hawaiians. Charmian Vistaunet / Design Pics / Getty Images

A decade-long fight over the proposed construction of a giant telescope on a mountain considered sacred by some Native Hawaiians came to a head Wednesday when 33 elders were arrested for blocking the road to the summit, HuffPost Reported.

Read More Show Less
A boy walks past a plastic-choked canal in in Phnom Penh, Cambodia on Jan. 17, 2019. TANG CHHIN SOTHY / AFP / Getty Images

Cambodia is the latest Asian country to reject the wealthy world's plastic waste.

Read More Show Less
Pick one of these nine activism styles, and you can start making change. YES! Illustrations by Delphine Lee

By Cathy Brown

Most of us have heard about UN researchers warning that we need to make dramatic changes in the next 12 years to limit our risk of extreme heat, drought, floods and poverty caused by climate change. Report after report about a bleak climate future can leave people in despair.

Read More Show Less