Quantcast

Donald Trump Blames Intern for Tweet Insulting Monsanto, Ben Carson and Iowa Republicans

Food

Presidential candidate Donald Trump has backtracked on a retweet that insulted Monsanto, his Republican rival Ben Carson and Iowa Republicans all at the same time.

The retweet in question? “Ben Carson is now leading in the polls in Iowa ... Too much Monsanto in the corn creates issues in the brain?” Ouch.

The original missive was sent by Twitter user @mygreenhippo after new polling showed that the retired neurosurgeon had soundly knocked the billionaire real estate mogul off his GOP presidential front-runner mantle (28 percent to Trump's 19 percent, according to the Des Moines Register/Bloomberg Politics) for the first time since Trump dominated the polls in the summer.

According to CNN, "this is the first major poll to find Trump trailing by a significant margin nationally or in the four early states since late June."

If it was sincere, Trump's retweet to his 5 million Twitter followers not only sounded like sour grapes about Carson's surge, it targeted Iowans who hold a lot of clout in the all-important Iowa caucus that kicks off the election season.

The retweet also shunned Monsanto, which has a major presence in Iowa, with facilities in 18 different cities in the state. While Monsanto doesn't exactly have a sterling public reputation (its nickname is MonSatan after all), let's also not forget that the agribusiness/biotech giant is a major GOP donor.

This could explain why Trump has backpedaled on the tweet, but as CNN observed, when Trump was asked in August if he endorses his retweets, he said, "Well I do retweets, and I mean, to a certain extent, I do, yeah. I think that's right. Do you want me to say no? You know, I retweet, I retweet for a reason."

Trump frequently uses Twitter to rouse support from his rabid fan base while provoking his detractors at the same time. Here's a recent Trump tweet about climate change, which he famously considers a "hoax."

Trump's Iowa polling retweet has since been deleted, and, I imagine, his poor intern heard "You're fired!" from the former Apprentice boss after making the alleged social media faux pas.

Incidentally, Trump's latest Twitter misstep brings to memory that other time his campaign pulled the same "my intern did it" excuse after one of his retweets featured imagery of soldiers in uniforms similar to those worn by Nazi troops.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Why Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders Are Rock Stars Among the Working Class

6 of Donald Trump’s Most Outrageous Tweets on Climate Change

Lawsuits Mount Against Monsanto’s ‘Cancer-Causing’ Weedkiller

2.6 Billion Pounds of Monsanto’s Glyphosate Sprayed on U.S. Farmland in Past Two Decades

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Dan Nosowitz

It's no secret that the past few years have been disastrous for the American farming industry.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Gavin Van De Walle, MS, RD

Medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil and coconut oil are fats that have risen in popularity alongside the ketogenic, or keto, diet.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Bijal Trivedi

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report on Nov. 13 that describes a list of microorganisms that have become resistant to antibiotics and pose a serious threat to public health. Each year these so-called superbugs cause more than 2.8 million infections in the U.S. and kill more than 35,000 people.

Read More Show Less
Rool Paap / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Inflammation can be good or bad depending on the situation.

Read More Show Less

By Joe Vukovich

Under the guise of responding to consumer complaints that today's energy- and water-efficient dishwashers take too long, the Department of Energy has proposed creating a new class of dishwashers that wouldn't be subject to any water or energy efficiency standards at all. The move would not only undermine three decades of progress for consumers and the environment, it is based on serious distortions of fact regarding today's dishwashers.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

By Emily Moran

If you have oak trees in your neighborhood, perhaps you've noticed that some years the ground is carpeted with their acorns, and some years there are hardly any. Biologists call this pattern, in which all the oak trees for miles around make either lots of acorns or almost none, "masting."

Read More Show Less

By Catherine Davidson

Tashi Yudon peeks out from behind a net curtain at the rooftops below and lets out a sigh, her breath frosting on the windowpane in front of her.

Some 700 kilometers away in the capital city Delhi, temperatures have yet to dip below 25 degrees Celsius, but in Spiti there is already an atmosphere of impatient expectation as winter settles over the valley.

Read More Show Less

The Dog Aging Project at the University of Washington is looking to recruit 10,000 dogs to study for the next 10 years to see if they can improve the life expectancy of man's best friend and their quality of life, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less