Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Donald Trump Attacked by Eagle Named Uncle Sam, GIF Goes Viral

Politics
Donald Trump Attacked by Eagle Named Uncle Sam, GIF Goes Viral

Here's some poetic justice for those Americans fed up with what critics are calling Donald Trump′s incessant bigotry and "demagoguery," as Bernie Sanders put it in an appearance on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon. TIME released footage Tuesday of Donald Trump getting attacked by an eagle named Uncle Sam, who he posed with in August for a TIME cover story.

Uncle Sam appears not to care for those who denigrate Americans, as many believe Trump has done with his statements. He's been compared to Adolf Hitler, George Wallace and (gasp) Lord Voldemort. For the record, J.K. Rowling confirmed Voldemort has nothing on Trump. And many in the environmental community probably can't help but see the bird's lashing out as a rebuke for Trump's outrageous claims on environmental issues, including the Keystone XL pipeline would have "no impact on the environment" and "the concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive."

Trump was runner up for TIME's Person of the Year. Bernie Sanders won the readers' choice by a wide margin for the annual award, but ultimately, the magazine's editors chose Angela Merkel.

People are having a field day with the GIF of Uncle Sam attacking The Donald.

Slate's Josh Voorhees said, "Forget TIME's Person of the Year, this if the GIF of the Year." And Ishaan Tharoor, who writes for The Washington Post, tweeted this:

Watch the full footage here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Bernie Slams Trump on The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon

J.K. Rowling Says Trump Worse Than Voldemort, Sen. Graham Says Trump Should ‘Go to Hell’

Bernie Wins Readers’ Poll for TIME Person of the Year But Gets Snubbed as Trump Makes Shortlist

Bernie Sanders: GOP Candidates Care More About Koch Money Than ‘Preserving the Planet for Our Children’

Hospital workers evacuate patients from the Feather River Hospital during the Camp Fire on Nov. 8, 2018 in Paradise, California. People in 128 countries have experienced an increased exposure to wildfires, a new Lancet report finds. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

The climate crisis already has a death toll, and it will get worse if we don't act to reduce emissions.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Workers harvest asparagus in a field by the Niederaussem lignite coal power plant in Cologne, Germany. Greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel burning are reaching new highs. Henning Kaiser / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

The UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres addressed the dire threat of climate change Wednesday in a speech on the state of the planet delivered at Columbia University in New York.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The miserable ones: Young broiler chickens at a feeder. The poor treatment of the chickens within its supply chain has made Tyson the target of public campaigns urging the company to make meaningful changes. U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

By David Coman-Hidy

The actions of the U.S. meat industry throughout the pandemic have brought to light the true corruption and waste that are inherent within our food system. Despite a new wave of rising COVID-19 cases, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently submitted a proposal to further increase "the maximum slaughter line speed by 25 percent," which was already far too fast and highly dangerous. It has been made evident that the industry will exploit its workers and animals all to boost its profit.

Read More Show Less
Altamira, state of Para, north of Brazil on Sept. 1, 2019. Amazon rainforest destruction surged between August 2019 and July 2020, Brazil's space agency reported. Gustavo Basso / NurPhoto via Getty Images

According to Brazil's space agency (Inpe), deforestation in the Amazon rainforest has surged to its highest level since 2008, the BBC reported.

Read More Show Less
United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres speaks during a press briefing at United Nations Headquarters on February 4, 2020 in New York City. Angela Weiss / AFP / Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

"The state of the planet is broken. Humanity is waging war on nature. This is suicidal."

That's how United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres began a Wednesday address at Columbia University, in which he reflected on the past 11 months of extreme weather and challenged world leaders to use the recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic as an opportunity to construct a better world free from destructive greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less