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How the DOI Is Selling Off Public Lands

Energy
Alan Majchrowicz / Photographer's Choice / Getty Images

The Trump administration's push to open up federal lands for oil and gas drilling, following successful lobbying from industry, is transforming swathes of the country, the New York Times reported in a comprehensive new piece.


An analysis of Interior Department data by the Times shows that nearly 13 million acres of federally-controlled oil and gas parcels have been offered for lease in the past fiscal year--twice the amount offered under the Obama administration's second term.

"The US government, and states like Wyoming and New Mexico where this surge in drilling on federal lands is taking place, are making some BIG $$$," the Times's Eric Lipton, who co-wrote the piece with Hiroko Tabuchi, tweeted this weekend. "Billions of dollars in fact ... Real benefit. Real money."

For a deeper dive:

New York Times

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