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Does Your State Make the Cut in 2014 Clean Tech Leadership Index?

Renewable Energy
Does Your State Make the Cut in 2014 Clean Tech Leadership Index?

If there is one thing that works in the world of advocacy, it is a ratings table that shows how one state, metropolitan area or utility compares to its peers. The latest report, U.S. Clean Tech Leadership Index, from Clean Edge does just that.

The fifth annual U.S. Clean Tech Leadership Index finds that California, Massachusetts, Oregon, Colorado and New York lead the way among states in solar and electric vehicle adoption, with smart climate policies and clean energy financing driving the clean tech leadership index growth.

Clean energy is becoming a popular choice for mainstream America with 11 states now generating more than 10 percent of their electricity from non-hydro renewable sources, according to the Clean Edge report. As seen in the graph below, Iowa leads the way in utility-scale wind, solar and geothermal electricity generation.

Meanwhile, California is leading the way on the uptake of electric vehicles.

 

Taking these factors into account, combined with metrics around green financing, Clean Edge has developed the chart below which shows that for the fifth year now, California has ranked number one out of all 50 states in the deployment of clean tech, with San Francisco taking the top spot by metropolitan area.

Ranking the states and cities in this way should prove a useful tool for advocates across the states. Environmental Defense Fund (EDF)’s work on designing a new regulatory model for New York will be assisted by the desire to move up the clean energy index, just as the work EDF is undertaking to shift the energy use of major cities such as Los Angeles, Austin and Boston will be helped by looking at what San Francisco is doing to achieve such a high score of 94.4 on the metro index.

So a big thank you goes out to Clean Edge for producing this material with the hope that this work continues.

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