Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Documentary Spotlight: The Human Experiment

Health + Wellness
Documentary Spotlight: The Human Experiment

One of my favorite events of the year is almost here—the Cleveland International Film Festival (CIFF) from March 19 to March 30 at Tower City Cinemas.

There are eight eco-films this year, in CIFF’s It’s Easy Being Green sidebar sponsored by Great Lakes Brewing Company, bringing awareness and support to the environmental movement working to save our planet.

In the last week, I've featured seven of the films, including: YemeniettesA Will for the WoodsSlingshot, MarmatoThe Horses of FukushimaFarmland and Antarctica: A Year on Ice.

Today, I'm featuring The Human Experiment, the documentary EcoWatch is sponsoring this year.

Actor Sean Penn narrates the film and is the force behind this documentary directed by Dana Nachman and Don Hardy, which raises awareness about toxic chemicals in everyday products.

CIFF’s Clint Rohrbacher provided this synopsis of the film:

If you made a list of the risks and dangers you face, it might include terrorist attacks, plane crashes, smoking and driving. But does it include your coffee mug, toothpaste, shaving cream or lipstick? After watching this thoughtful and disturbing documentary, it will. Since the rise of chemical usage began, certain illnesses started to spike as well. Breast cancer, autism and infertility all rose dramatically as new chemicals made their way into virtually every product touching our lives—with few, if any, regulations or requirements to prove safety. With public awareness grew a powerful web of lobbyists and PR firms whose job is to deflect blame and responsibility from a hugely profitable industrial base. (If the “4 Dog Defense” doesn't boil your blood, nothing will.) Following powerful individual cases and using testimony from medical professionals and politicians, The Human Experiment will both alert you to dangers and show you what you can do about them. This is a film that much of Corporate America does not want you to see. We do. 

Visit EcoWatch’s HEALTH page for more related news on this topic.

Producing avocado and almond crops is having a detrimental effect on bees. Molly Aaker / Getty Images

At first glance, you wouldn't think avocados and almonds could harm bees; but a closer look at how these popular crops are produced reveals their potentially detrimental effect on pollinators.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An electric vehicle is plugged in to an EV charging station at a Walmart parking lot in Duarte, California on Sept. 14, 2018. FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP via Getty Images

Six major U.S. electricity utilities will collaborate to build a massive EV charging network across 16 states, they announced Tuesday.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Matthew Micah Wright / The Image Bank / Getty Images

By Deborah Moore, Michael Simon and Darryl Knudsen

There's some good news amidst the grim global pandemic: At long last, the world's largest dam removal is finally happening.

Read More Show Less
Scrap metal is loaded into a shredder at a metal recycling facility on July 17, 2008 in Chicago, Illinois. Scott Olson / Getty Images

Hunger strikers in Chicago are fighting the relocation of a metal shredding facility from a white North Side neighborhood to a predominantly Black and Latinx community on the Southeast Side already plagued by numerous polluting industries.

Read More Show Less
A new UK study links eating meat with increased risks for heart disease, diabetes and more. nata_zhekova / Getty Images

The World Health Organization has determined that red meat probably causes colorectal cancer in humans and that processed meat is carcinogenic to humans. But are there other health risks of meat consumption?

Read More Show Less