Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Documentary Spotlight: Marmato

Documentary Spotlight: Marmato

One of my favorite events of the year is almost here—the Cleveland International Film Festival (CIFF) from March 19 to March 30 at Tower City Cinemas.

There are eight eco-films this year, in CIFF’s It’s Easy Being Green sidebar sponsored by Great Lakes Brewing Company, bringing awareness and support to the environmental movement working to save our planet.

I’ll feature one film per day. Today, Marmato. Yesterday, The Horses of Fukushima. Tuesday, Farmland. Monday, Antarctica: A Year on Ice.

CIFF’s Clint Rohrbacher provided this synopsis of the film:

Marmato is a mountain village in Columbia sitting on one of the greatest gold reserves in the world. For 500 years the residents have mined the gold with traditional methods. In 2006 a Canadian mining company bought the mines from the government. Now the town's future is at stake as an open-pit mining project is proposed. More than 8,000 inhabitants and a culture are about to face extinction as Marmato becomes ground zero in the global gold rush. Filmed over a course of six years, this stunning and emotional documentary follows the miners deep into the dangerous mines and even deeper into the souls of a populace determined to fight for their homes. As we meet the miners and their families, the human cost becomes very clear. With gorgeous cinematography and an air of magic realism, Marmato follows the battle between the impassioned residents and the wealth and power of globalized mining. Even though their own government seems to be against them, this mining community refuses to back down and accept that gold is more precious than people. (In Spanish with English subtitles)

Visit EcoWatch’s BIODIVERSITY page for more related news on this topic.

 

Valley of the Gods in the heart of Bears Ears National Monument. Mint Images / Getty Images

By Sharon Buccino

This week, Secretary Haaland chose a visit to Bears Ears National Monument as her first trip as Interior Secretary. She is spending three days in Bluff, Utah, a small town just outside the monument, listening to representatives of the five tribes who first proposed its designation to President Obama in 2015. This is the same town where former Secretary Sally Jewell spent several hours at a public hearing in July 2016 before recommending the monument's designation to President Obama.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Pexels

By Anthony Richardson, Chhaya Chaudhary, David Schoeman, and Mark John Costello

The tropical water at the equator is renowned for having the richest diversity of marine life on Earth, with vibrant coral reefs and large aggregations of tunas, sea turtles, manta rays and whale sharks. The number of marine species naturally tapers off as you head towards the poles.

Read More Show Less
Trending
"Secrets of the Whales" is a new series that will start streaming on Disney+ on Earth Day. Disney+

In celebration of Earth Day, a star-studded cast is giving fans a rare glimpse into the secret lives of some of the planet's most majestic animals: whales. In "Secrets of the Whales," a four-part documentary series by renowned National Geographic Photographer and Explorer Brian Skerry and Executive Producer James Cameron, viewers plunge deep into the lives and worlds of five different whale species.

Read More Show Less
Spring is an excellent time to begin bird watching in earnest. Eugenio Marongiu / Cultura / Getty Images

The coronavirus has isolated many of us in our homes this year. We've been forced to slow down a little, maybe looking out our windows, becoming more in tune with the rhythms of our yards. Perhaps we've begun to notice more, like the birds hopping around in the bushes out back, wondering (maybe for the first time) what they are.

Read More Show Less
The brown pelican is seen on Queen Bess Island in Louisiana in March 2021. Casey Wright / LDWF biologist

Who says you can't go home again?

Read More Show Less