Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Do You Know Your Spirit Vegetable? Take this Quiz to Find Out

Food
Istetiana / Getty Images

By Brian Barth

Santa Barbara-based farmer, chef, and educator Michelle Aronson is an outgoing type. She's become known among for her friends for a certain party trick: "I would get to know people and on the spot come up with their spirit vegetable."


In May, she took this talent national with the Spirit Vegetable Quiz, which can be found on the website of her cooking class business, Farm Belly. The ten-question quiz assesses where you fall on the introvert-extrovert spectrum and your favorite season, among traits. Sample question: How would you describe the contents of your closet? A) It's a kaleidoscope of color. B) Neutrals make my heart pitter patter.

At the end, you're endowed with your spirit vegetable and an oracle-like message. Mine turned out to be fennel:

"There's a lot to love behind the many layers that make up a unique, subtly-sweet bulb of fennel. It takes some time to peel back those layers, but once this introverted veggie has time to open up, you'll find fennel is grounded, driven, and has a heart brimming with passion … You don't come across fennel every day, which makes this quietly confident vegetable all the more mysterious and memorable."

Aronson spent much of last winter developing her quiz. How? A giant spreadsheet that charted the question and answers and their relationship to 22 vegetables. Then she hired a web designer to turn it all into an algorithm. The online quiz was taken 16,000 times within a few months—about as viral as it gets for vegetables.

"My whole life revolves around vegetables, and at some point, I started associating them with personalities, just based on things like their growing tendencies, their appearance and how you cook with them," said Aronson.

The game has helped the serial entrepreneur launch yet another side business. After your vegetable is revealed to you, you're offered the opportunity to purchase Farm Belly swag (totes, T-shirts, and mugs) emblazoned with it. A portion of proceeds goes to Alice Waters Edible Schoolyard Project in Berkeley. "People get excited about rocking their spirit vegetable," said Aronson.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Modern Farmer.

Related Articles Around the Web

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Marco Bottigelli / Moment / Getty Images

By James Shulmeister

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change.

If you have a question you'd like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz

Read More Show Less
Luxy Images / Getty Images

By Jo Harper

Investment in U.S. offshore wind projects are set to hit $78 billion (€69 billion) this decade, in contrast with an estimated $82 billion for U.S. offshore oil and gasoline projects, Wood Mackenzie data shows. This would be a remarkable feat only four years after the first offshore wind plant — the 30 megawatt (MW) Block Island Wind Farm off the coast of Rhode Island — started operating in U.S. waters.

Read More Show Less
Giacomo Berardi / Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed both the strengths and limitations of globalization. The crisis has made people aware of how industrialized food production can be, and just how far food can travel to get to the local supermarket. There are many benefits to this system, including low prices for consumers and larger, even global, markets for producers. But there are also costs — to the environment, workers, small farmers and to a region or individual nation's food security.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Joe Leech

The human body comprises around 60% water.

It's commonly recommended that you drink eight 8-ounce (237-mL) glasses of water per day (the 8×8 rule).

Read More Show Less

By Michael Svoboda

The enduring pandemic will make conventional forms of travel difficult if not impossible this summer. As a result, many will consider virtual alternatives for their vacations, including one of the oldest forms of virtual reality – books.

Read More Show Less
Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility on Thursday accused NOAA of ignoring its own scientists' findings about the endangerment of the North Atlantic right whale. Lauren Packard / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Julia Conley

As the North Atlantic right whale was placed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's list of critically endangered species Thursday, environmental protection groups accusing the U.S. government of bowing to fishing and fossil fuel industry pressure to downplay the threat and failing to enact common-sense restrictions to protect the animals.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Pexels

By Beth Ann Mayer

Since even moderate-intensity workouts offer a slew of benefits, walking is a good choice for people looking to stay healthy.

Read More Show Less