Quantcast

Do You Know Your Spirit Vegetable? Take this Quiz to Find Out

Food
Istetiana / Getty Images

By Brian Barth

Santa Barbara-based farmer, chef, and educator Michelle Aronson is an outgoing type. She's become known among for her friends for a certain party trick: "I would get to know people and on the spot come up with their spirit vegetable."


In May, she took this talent national with the Spirit Vegetable Quiz, which can be found on the website of her cooking class business, Farm Belly. The ten-question quiz assesses where you fall on the introvert-extrovert spectrum and your favorite season, among traits. Sample question: How would you describe the contents of your closet? A) It's a kaleidoscope of color. B) Neutrals make my heart pitter patter.

At the end, you're endowed with your spirit vegetable and an oracle-like message. Mine turned out to be fennel:

"There's a lot to love behind the many layers that make up a unique, subtly-sweet bulb of fennel. It takes some time to peel back those layers, but once this introverted veggie has time to open up, you'll find fennel is grounded, driven, and has a heart brimming with passion … You don't come across fennel every day, which makes this quietly confident vegetable all the more mysterious and memorable."

Aronson spent much of last winter developing her quiz. How? A giant spreadsheet that charted the question and answers and their relationship to 22 vegetables. Then she hired a web designer to turn it all into an algorithm. The online quiz was taken 16,000 times within a few months—about as viral as it gets for vegetables.

"My whole life revolves around vegetables, and at some point, I started associating them with personalities, just based on things like their growing tendencies, their appearance and how you cook with them," said Aronson.

The game has helped the serial entrepreneur launch yet another side business. After your vegetable is revealed to you, you're offered the opportunity to purchase Farm Belly swag (totes, T-shirts, and mugs) emblazoned with it. A portion of proceeds goes to Alice Waters Edible Schoolyard Project in Berkeley. "People get excited about rocking their spirit vegetable," said Aronson.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Modern Farmer.

Related Articles Around the Web

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pro-environment demonstrators on the streets of Washington, DC during the Jan. 20, 2017 Trump inauguration. Mobilus In Mobili / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

By Dr. Brian R. Shmaefsky

One year after the Flint Water Crisis I was invited to participate in a water rights session at a conference hosted by the US Human Rights Network in Austin, Texas in 2015. The reason I was at the conference was to promote efforts by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to encourage scientists to shine a light on how science intersects with human rights, in the U.S. as well as in the context of international development. My plan was to sit at an information booth and share my stories about water quality projects I spearheaded in communities in Bangladesh, Colombia, and the Philippines. I did not expect to be thrown into conversations that made me reexamine how scientists use their knowledge as a public good.

Read More
Mt. Rainier and Reflection Lake on Sept. 10, 2015. Crystal Geyser planned to open a bottling plant near Mt. Rainier, emails show. louelke - on and off / Flickr

Bottled water manufacturers looking to capture cool, mountain water from Washington's Cascade Mountains may have to look elsewhere after the state senate passed a bill banning new water permits, as The Guardian reported.

Read More
Sponsored
Large storage tank of Ammonia at a fertilizer plant in Cubatão, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Luis Veiga / The Image Bank / Getty Images

The shipping industry is coming to grips with its egregious carbon footprint, as it has an outsized contribution to greenhouse gas emissions and to the dumping of chemicals into open seas. Already, the global shipping industry contributes about 2 percent of global carbon emissions, about the same as Germany, as the BBC reported.

Read More
At high tide, people are forced off parts of the pathway surrounding DC's Tidal Basin. Andrew Bossi / Wikimedia

By Sarah Kennedy

The Jefferson Memorial in Washington, DC overlooks the Tidal Basin, a man-made body of water surrounded by cherry trees. Visitors can stroll along the water's edge, gazing up at the stately monument.

But at high tide, people are forced off parts of the path. Twice a day, the Tidal Basin floods and water spills onto the walkway.

Read More
Lioness displays teeth during light rainstorm in Kruger National Park, South Africa. johan63 / iStock / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Ahead of government negotiations scheduled for next week on a global plan to address the biodiversity crisis, 23 former foreign ministers from various countries released a statement on Tuesday urging world leaders to act "boldly" to protect nature.

Read More