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Do You Have What It Takes to Change the World?

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Do You Have What It Takes to Change the World?

If you think you have what it takes to change the world and are an undergraduate or graduate student, now is the time to apply for the the Lemelson-MIT National Collegiate Student Prize Competition, which honors promising collegiate inventors around the country.

The competition is open to teams of undergraduate students and individual graduate students who have inventions in the following four categories representing significant sectors of the economy:

“Cure it!” rewards students working on technology-based inventions that can improve healthcare.

“Drive it!” rewards students working on technology-based inventions that can improve transportation.

“Eat it!” rewards students working on technology-based inventions that can improve food and agriculture.

“Use it!” rewards students working on technology-based inventions that can improve consumer devices and tools.

The "Eat It!" category is a new prize this year. "Adding the Eat it! category recognizes the important role of food and agriculture in the national economy, and provides an opportunity for students across the United States to significantly impact the food system through technology," said Emma Shorr of Food Tank.

Graduate winners receive a prize of US$15,000 and undergraduates a prize of US$10,000 in each category. They both receive national media coverage, exposure to business and investment communities, and a trip to the award ceremony at MIT. Applications are open until Jan. 30, 2015. To apply, click here.

The Lemelson-MIT Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was founded by Jerome H. Lemelson, one of U.S. history’s most prolific inventors, and his wife Dorothy in 1994. The programs are funded by the Lemelson Foundation and administered by MIT's School of Engineering. The Lemelson Foundation "uses the power of invention to improve lives, by inspiring and enabling the next generation of inventors and invention based enterprises to promote economic growth in the U.S. and social and economic progress for the poor in developing countries."

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