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‘Dirty Duke' TV Ad Exposes Largest Power Company in the U.S.

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‘Dirty Duke' TV Ad Exposes Largest Power Company in the U.S.

It's just 30 seconds, but it's powerful.

Presente.org and The Other 98% premiered an advertisement in the Charlotte, NC and Orlando, FL markets May 1 highlighting Duke Energy’s campaign to put a halt to solar energy, as well as the damage done by the company's coal ash spill in the Dan River in February. It sarcastically mocks the company with an upbeat narrator declaring that the company makes some of the "dirtiest power."

The advocacy groups chose to air the ad on the same day as Duke's annual shareholder meeting.

Duke is the largest electric power holding company in the U.S. That's why Presente, The Other 98% and groups like the Sierra Club, 350.0rgSachamama and the League of Conservation Voters are encouraging people to sign a petition to tell the company to end its dirty pollution. The groups charge that communities that consists of minorities are the ones that bear the brunt of dirty energy, though they would benefit most from the expansion of renewable energy.

“Latino communities are sick of Duke Energy poisoning our families and undermining our efforts to get clean energy,” said Arturo Carmona, executive director of Presente.org.

“Times are changing, and Duke can no longer get away with polluting our communities in secret. We demand Duke stop destroying our climate, our health, and our neighborhoods.” 

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