Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Desmond Tutu: It's Time to 'Move Beyond the Fossil Fuel Era'

Climate
Desmond Tutu: It's Time to 'Move Beyond the Fossil Fuel Era'

This weekend, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, a long-time advocate for the environment, released a powerful video urging the world leaders in New York City for the UN Climate Summit to "move beyond the fossil fuel era."

The Nobel Prize-winning retired archbishop from South Africa said "the destruction of Earth's environment is the human rights challenge of our time" whose "most devastating effects are visited on the poor." He warned that "time is running out" and called the UN Summit  "a decisive moment in the struggle to maintain God's Earth" and "a rare opportunity to begin to set a better course for our planet."

He urged action by nations and individuals on several fronts, including freezing exploration for fossil fuels, redirecting investments from fossil fuels into renewable energy sources, encouraging governments to stop accepting money from the fossil fuel industry and holding those who have damaged the environment legally liable for the harm they have caused.

"We can no longer tinker about the edges," he said. "We can no longer continuing treating our addiction to fossil fuels as if there were no tomorrow, or there will be no tomorrow."

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Climate Leaders Tell Bill Moyers About The Need For Global Fossil Fuel Divestment

Pope Francis Calls Destruction of Nature a Modern Sin

A Zero Emissions Manifesto for the Climate Justice Movement

A sea turtle rescued from Israel's devastating oil spill. MENAHEM KAHANA / AFP via Getty Images

Rescue workers in Israel are using a surprising cure to save the sea turtles harmed by a devastating oil spill: mayonnaise!

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A "digital twin of Earth." European Space Agency

As the weather grows more severe, and its damages more expensive and fatal, current weather predictions fall short in providing reliable information on Earth's rapidly changing systems.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Melting ice in places such as Greenland could stop a critical ocean current. Paul Souders / Getty Images

The climate crisis could push an important ocean current past a critical tipping point sooner than expected, new research suggests.

Read More Show Less
California Gov. Gavin Newsom tours the Chevron oil field west of Bakersfield, where a spill of more than 900,000 gallons flowed into a dry creek bed, on July 24, 2019. Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

Accusing California regulators of "reckless disregard" for public "health and safety," the environmental advocacy group Center for Biological Diversity on Wednesday sued the administration of Gov. Gavin Newsom for approving thousands of oil and gas drilling and fracking projects without the required environmental review.

Read More Show Less
Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and Kenyan professor Wangari Maathai poses during the COP15 UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark on December 15, 2009. Olivier Morin / AFP / Getty Images

By Kate Whiting

From Greta Thunberg to Sir David Attenborough, the headline-grabbing climate change activists and environmentalists of today are predominantly white. But like many areas of society, those whose voices are heard most often are not necessarily representative of the whole.

Read More Show Less