Quantcast

Denver Calls on Colorado Senators to Reject the Keystone XL Pipeline

Energy

[Editors note: On Tuesday, May 6, 350 Colorado organized and hosted an anti-Keystone XL rally calling on Sen. Udall (D-CO) and Sen. Bennet (D-CO) to join with them in their fight against the pipeline. With only 72 hours to get the word out, the action was a great success— almost 150 people turned up to show their support of a Keystone XL pipeline veto. Campaign organizer Katie Falkenberg sums up the day of action below.]

[blackoutgallery id="333700"]

Rallying for Solutions

We started the morning with a rally in support of expanding Demand Side Management (policies that aim to reduce energy consumption through energy efficiency) with Frack Free ColoradoSierra ClubClean Energy Action. We wanted to get the message out across that Colorado needs affordable solutions for converting to renewable energy and Demand Side Management is the best answer. We knew Gov. Hickenlooper (D-CO) was across the street and we hope he got the message loud and clear that expanding DSM is crucial to combating climate change and protecting the environment. 

Sending Udall a Message

Next, we gathered up our banners, signs and mock pipeline and marched all the way from the Capitol to Sen. Udall’s office where another mini rally commenced featuring some amazing speakers. I was blown away by the amount of people waiting for us at his office when we arrived—well over a hundred people were there.

What Will Bennet Do?

When we went to deliver the letters and signatures to Sen. Udall’s staff they seemed to be a bit unprepared. With a big Senate race against a Republican with a strong pro-petroleum stance, we know he could swing either depending on the cash flow. We made sure to send Sen. Udall's staff a strong message that no matter how much money gets pumped into the senate race, Colorado stands strongly against the Keystone XL pipeline.

The march continued on to Sen. Bennet’s office, back through the 16th Street mall, complete with chanting and singing. No doubt, we had the attention of everyone within eye and ear shot. A huge thanks to Jonny 5 of the Flobots for leading us and keeping the crowd momentum up. We couldn’t have done it without him.

Again, we were met with a promise to deliver our message to the Senator, who was believed to be heading to Washington this week for a crucial Keystone XL Senate vote. Bennet has in the past said he is in favor of the pipeline, but as of last week he was still undecided on his vote for this issue. He has stated in the past:

I do support it,” Sen. Bennet said in an interview. “I wish we were supporting it as part of a broad energy strategy for the U.S. And maybe someday we’ll get to a place where we are actually pursuing a broader energy strategy for the U.S.”

Update:

350 Colorado has heard that Sen. Udall will likely vote against the bill. It appears the tide could be turning against Big Oil. Sen. Bennet is one of the last undecided members of the Senate. It’s time he do what’s right for Colorado and the climate, and vote against the pipeline.

Sen. Udall:

DC office – 202-224-5941 or 877-768-3255 (toll free for Coloradans)
Colorado office – 303-650-7820

Sen. Bennet:
DC office – 202-224-5852
Colorado office – 303-455-7600

--------

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

56 Senators Try to Force Keystone XL Pipeline Past President Obama and the Public

Thousands March at 'Reject and Protect' Protesting Keystone XL Pipeline 

Could We Win the Keystone XL Battle But Still Lose the Tar Sands War?

-------- 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Students hold a Youth Strike for Climate Change Protest in London, UK on May 24. Dinendra Haria / SOPA Images / LightRocket via Getty Images

The New York City public schools will allow their 1.1 million students to skip school for Friday's global climate strike, The New York Times reported Monday.

Read More Show Less
The 16-year-old Swede Greta Thunberg speaks during her protest action for more climate protection with a reporter. Steffen Trumpf / picture alliance / Getty Images

By Mark Hertsgaard and Kyle Pope

It's been 30 years since Bill McKibben rang the warning bells about the threat of man-made climate change — first in a piece in The New Yorker, and then in his book, The End of Nature.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
At the International Motor Show (IAA), climate protestors are calling for a change in transportation politics. © Kevin McElvaney / Greenpeace

Thousands of protestors marched in front of Frankfurt's International Motor Show (IAA) on Saturday to show their disgust with the auto industry's role in the climate crisis. The protestors demanded an end to combustion engines and a shift to more environmentally friendly emissions-free vehicles, as Reuters reported.

Read More Show Less
Setting and testing the line protections for Siemens SF6 gas insulated switchgear in 2007. Xaf / Flickr / CC BY-NC 2.0

Electricity from renewable sources is growing exponentially as the technology allows for cheaper and more efficient energy generation, but there is a dark side that has the industry polluting the most powerful greenhouse gas known to humanity, as the BBC reported.

Read More Show Less
Ella Olsson / Pexels

By Elizabeth Streit, MS, RDN, LD

Sweet and regular potatoes are both tuberous root vegetables, but they differ in appearance and taste.

They come from separate plant families, offer different nutrients, and affect your blood sugar differently.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Scientists in Saskatchewan found that consuming small amounts of neonicotinoids led white-crowned sparrows to lose significant amounts of weight and delay migration, threatening their ability to reproduce. Jen Goellnitz / Flickr

By Julia Conley

In addition to devastating effects on bee populations and the pollination needed to feed humans and other species, widely-used pesticides chemically related to nicotine may be deadly to birds and linked to some species' declines, according to a new study.

Read More Show Less

German Chancellor Angela Merkel's government is set to unveil a package of measures on Friday, Sept. 20, to ensure that the country cuts its greenhouse gas emissions 55% by 2030, compared with the 1990 levels.

Read More Show Less
Assorted plastic bottles. mali maeder / Pexels

California ended its 2019 legislative session Saturday without passing two bills that would have led the nation in tackling plastic pollution, The Mercury News reported.

Read More Show Less