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Deadline to Apply: Jan. 15 for Full-Tuition Scholarship in Columbia University’s Masters Program

The Master of Public Administration in Environmental Science and Policy now offers the Dean’s Environmental Science and Policy Fellowship—the first full tuition grant made in the program’s 12-year history. All prospective students who apply to the program by Jan. 15, 2015, will be eligible for the Fellowship, valued at approximately $72,000.

In addition to the tuition grant, the Dean’s Fellow will also receive an internship in the Program on Sustainability Policy and Management. The internship, which is worth $7,500, will provide the Dean’s Fellow valuable work experience in an innovative research program.

The program also awards numerous Environmental Sustainability Fellowships of up to $20,000. Nearly half of all students in the program receive partial fellowships. All awards, including the Dean’s Fellowship, are based on academic merit and financial need. The application deadline for fellowship consideration is Jan. 15, 2015. Visit our website to learn more about the application process. Applicants must complete the online application form (select Summer 2015) and supply the following documents to be considered for admission:

  • Personal statement
  • Professional resume
  • Academic resume
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Transcripts from undergraduate institutions (unofficial copies can be used for admissions)
  • GRE or GMAT scores
  • Students who received their bachelor’s degree in a country where English is not the primary language of instruction must submit TOEFL scores.

This 12-month program—jointly developed by Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and The Earth Institute—trains sophisticated managers and policymakers to apply innovative, interdisciplinary and sustainable solutions to environmental issues. Our integrated approach reflects the system-level thinking that is needed to understand ecological interactions and maintain the health of Earth’s interconnected systems.

Graduates are working in diverse organizations domestically and globally as consultants, environmental protection and restoration specialists, project managers, policy analysts, directors of environmental services, environmental and public health advisors, teachers, researchers, and environmental biologists and engineers.

Students in the MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program enroll in a year-long, 54-credit program offered at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, in partnership with the Earth Institute.

Since it began in 2002, the MPA in Environmental Science and Policy program has given students the hands-on experience, and the analytical and decision-making tools to implement effective environmental and sustainable management policies.

The program’s 682 graduates have advanced to jobs in domestic and international environmental policy, working in government, private and non-profit sectors. Their work involves issues of sustainability, resource use and global change, in fields focused on air, water, climate, energy efficiency, food, agriculture, transportation and waste management. They work as consultants, advisers, project managers, program directors, policy analysts, teachers, researchers, and environmental scientists and engineers.

For more information about the program, visit our website at http://mpaenvironment.ei.columbia.edu or contact Sarah Tweedie, assistant director, at st2745@columbia.edu or 212-854-3142.

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