Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Dead Whale Washes Up on Scotland Beach After Being Tangled in Fishing Net

Animals
Dead Whale Washes Up on Scotland Beach After Being Tangled in Fishing Net

A 23-foot minke whale washed up on a beach in St. Andrews, Scotland, after getting caught in fishing net.

The whale, believed to be male, was spotted on the beach Wednesday night, according to the Daily Record. A pathologist for the Scottish Marine Animal Stranding Scheme (SMASS) conducted an autopsy Thursday. SMASS collects data from stranded marine animals to learn more about them.

Dead Minke whale on the beach at St Andrews. Photo credit: via Facebook

Andrew Brownlow, SMASS pathologist, told STVNews:

We have a good idea of what happened to this animal. It looks like it was entangled quite recently. That's probably the reason why it's died. There seems to be some cuts along the tail stock that would be consistent with it being cut in some form of fishing rope.
The most common cause in other species is creel fishing. Often the rope that goes from the creel trap to the surface buoy leaves a loop in the water and it seems that animals become entangled in the rope.

Brownlow added that entanglement is becoming a more common cause of death for marine animals. He hopes by studying this whale's death and others, SMASS will gather enough information to build prevention programs.

SMASS is urging people to not approach the dead whale, the Daily Record added. Brownlow said there's a slight chance that the animal could be carrying infectious bacteria that could be harmful for those who come into contact with the carcass.

“The chance of people picking up anything is actually very small," he told the Daily Record. "They carry some diseases which can be harmful but in general they're actually relatively benign. But you never know."

The whale is thought to have become entangled in fishing ropes. Photo credit: via Facebook

Brownlow doesn't expect this whale to exploded unlike the infamous sperm whales.

“Their physiology and anatomy isn't quite the same as sperm whales—those things are like submarines so they are a very different undertaking for a post mortem," he said.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

40 Dead Tiger Cubs Found in Freezer at Thai Buddhist Temple

Who's to Blame for Harambe's Death?

Could Pixar's 'Finding Dory' Have an Adverse Effect on Coral Reefs?

Three 'Man-Eating' Crocodiles Found in Florida Everglades

A seagull flies in front of the Rampion offshore wind farm in the United Kingdom. Neil / CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

A key part of the United States' clean energy transition has started to take shape, but you may need to squint to see it. About 2,000 wind turbines could be built far offshore, in federal waters off the Atlantic Coast, in the next 10 years. And more are expected.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Frank La Sorte and Kyle Horton

Millions of birds travel between their breeding and wintering grounds during spring and autumn migration, creating one of the greatest spectacles of the natural world. These journeys often span incredible distances. For example, the Blackpoll warbler, which weighs less than half an ounce, may travel up to 1,500 miles between its nesting grounds in Canada and its wintering grounds in the Caribbean and South America.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Kevin Maillefer / Unsplash

By Lynne Peeples

Editor's note: This story is part of a nine-month investigation of drinking water contamination across the U.S. The series is supported by funding from the Park Foundation and Water Foundation. Read the launch story, "Thirsting for Solutions," here.

In late September 2020, officials in Wrangell, Alaska, warned residents who were elderly, pregnant or had health problems to avoid drinking the city's tap water — unless they could filter it on their own.

Read More Show Less
Eat Just's cell-based chicken nugget is now served at Singapore restaurant 1880. Eat Just, Inc.

At a time of impending global food scarcity, cell-based meats and seafood have been heralded as the future of food.

Read More Show Less
New Zealand sea lions are an endangered species and one of the rarest species of sea lions in the world. Art Wolfe / Photodisc / Getty Images

One city in New Zealand knows what its priorities are.

Dunedin, the second largest city on New Zealand's South Island, has closed a popular road to protect a mother sea lion and her pup, The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less