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Day One Agenda for Trump Administration: Energy Deregulation

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Day One Agenda for Trump Administration: Energy Deregulation

As Barack Obama moves out of the White House to thunderous applause from the scientific community, what's on the energy and environment docket for Day One of the Trump Administration? Trump aides have promised swift and aggressive action on a long list of various campaign priorities, but remain opaque about the process and order of possible immediate changes.

Regardless, climate hawks should keep an eye out: Bloomberg reported this morning that advisors have prepared an energy/enviro "short list," which includes reversing Obama administration guidelines on factoring climate change into pipeline construction and steps to suspend the social cost of carbon.

And campaign advisor and oil CEO Harold Hamm told CNBC he projects energy deregulation will be a "Day One agenda" item. The GOP got an early start moving their deregulation goals Thursday, as Rep Evan Jenkins, R-WV, introduced a resolution to permanently block the Obama administration's stream protection regulations.

"Trump has threatened to roll back so many hard-won progressive gains, including those on climate, but he can't take away our resolve to fight back at every turn," 350.org Executive Director May Boeve said.

"The impacts of extreme weather in a warming world already costed the U.S. hundreds of human lives and $46 billion in damages during the past year alone. While globally the concentration of climate changing CO2 in our planet's atmosphere continues to rise to new record levels with the World Meteorological Organization confirming 2016 was the hottest year on record. Now more than ever, elected officials worldwide need to heed to the urgency of the climate crisis and stand with science to safeguard a livable planet for communities worldwide."

For a deeper dive:

Obama: Climate Central

Trump day one: Washington Post, Reuters, AP, WSJ

Energy/enviro list: Bloomberg

Hamm: CNBC

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