Quantcast

This 13-Year-Old's Reaction to DAPL Victory Says It All

Popular

By Alexandra Rosenmann

When the U.S. federal government announced that it would not be issuing the permit necessary for continuing construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, the Standing Rock Sioux and their allies were overjoyed. Having protested the pipeline's construction for months, the announcement marked a decisive victory in combating environmental racism, not just in America, but around the globe.

More than 200 Native Americans nations and their allies celebrated the unexpected turning point. Yet, at the center of it all is a 13-year-old water-warrior named Tokata Iron Eyes, who lives on the Standing Rock reservation.

"You helped start this movement, didn't you?" Social activist and author Naomi Klein asked Iron Eyes on Dec. 4, to which the 13-year-old revealed the origin of the action against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

"This entire movement was brought up by the youth," Tokata Iron Eyes told Klein. "It just started so small and then this entire camp was built ... the easement for DAPL was denied ... [I feel] like I got my future back."

Watch here:

Reposted with permission from our media associate AlterNet.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Indigenous people of various ethnic groups protest calling for demarcation of lands during the closing of the 'Red January - Indigenous Blood', in Paulista Avenue, in São Paulo, Brazil, Jan. 31, 2019. Cris Faga / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Raphael Tsavkko Garcia

Rarely has something so precious fallen into such unsafe hands. Since Jair Bolsonaro took the Brazilian presidency in 2019, the Amazon, which makes up 10 percent of our planet's biodiversity and absorbs an estimated 5 percent of global carbon emissions, has been hit with a record number of fires and unprecedented deforestation.

Read More
Microsoft's main campus in Redmond, Washington on May 12, 2017. GLENN CHAPMAN / AFP via Getty Images

Microsoft announced ambitious new plans to become carbon negative by 2030 and then go one step further and remove by 2050 all the carbon it has emitted since the company was founded in 1975, according to a company press release.

Read More
Sponsored
Nestlé is accelerating its efforts to bring functional, safe and environmentally friendly packaging solutions to the market and to address the global challenge of plastic packaging waste. Nestlé / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Nestlé, the world's largest food company, said it will invest up to $2 billion to address the plastic waste crisis that it is largely responsible for.

Read More
Yellow soft shell D-vitamin capsule held to the sun. Helin Loik-Tomson / iStock / Getty Images

By Margherita T. Cantorna

Winter is upon us and so is the risk of vitamin D deficiency and infections. Vitamin D, which is made in our skin following sunlight exposure and also found in oily fish (mackerel, tuna and sardines), mushrooms and fortified dairy and nondairy substitutes, is essential for good health. Humans need vitamin D to keep healthy and to fight infections. The irony is that in winter, when people need vitamin D the most, most of us are not getting enough. So how much should we take? Should we take supplements? How do we get more? And, who needs it most?

Read More
The common murre population in Alaska has been decimated by an ocean heatwave. Linda Burek / iStock / Getty Images Plus

An expanse of uncommonly warm seawater in the Pacific Ocean created by a marine heatwave led to a mass die-off of one million seabirds, scientists have found.

Read More