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Damocracy the Movie

Climate
Damocracy the Movie

International Rivers

Damocracy is a short documentary that exposes the myth of dams as ‘green’ energy through two examples from Amazonia and Mesopotamia. Filmmaker Todd Southgate travels from the deepest corners of the vast Amazon rainforest in Brazil to the mountains and plains of fertile upper Mesopotamia in south east Turkey. He meets academics, lawyers, campaigners and local communities whose livelihood is threatened by two monster dam projects—Belo Monte in Brazil and Ilisu in Turkey.

The documentary shows the potential disasters these dams would cause on cultural heritage, wildlife and local communities who rely on the rich natural resources provided by the Tigris and Xingu rivers. The film also questions the sanity of climate change solutions that depend on the destruction of "the lungs of the Earth" and "the cradle of civilization." It is a call to action to save this priceless natural and cultural heritage being gambled for the interests of a few.

The documentary will be released in February 2013.

Visit EcoWatch’s WATER and ENERGY pages for more related news on this topic.

 

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