Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Trump Seeks 'Massive' EPA Cuts to Climate Programs to Boost Military Spending

Popular
Trump Seeks 'Massive' EPA Cuts to Climate Programs to Boost Military Spending

President Trump will substantially slash funding to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to help increase military spending in his first budget plan, the New York Times and Axios reported Sunday.

Cabinet and agency officials will be asked today to prepare budget requests ahead of the administration budget's release on March 13 and sources tell Axios and the New York Times that the EPA and the State Department are particular targets for deep funding cuts meant to help fulfill Trump's campaign promise to boost defense spending. Axios sources in particular report "massive, transformational cuts" to EPA climate change programs.

"A budget is a statement of priorities, and with this proposal, Trump is telling America he doesn't care about what happens to children who are forced to drink toxic water and breath polluted air," Sierra Club Executive Director Michael Brune said.

"Trump's budget guts the Environmental Protection Agency—the only federal agency charged with keeping our air and water clean—starves our cherished parks and threatens our wildlife. This is a budget rigged to boost the profits of corporate polluters at the expense of the health of our families."

Trump's first budget plan isn't the only news from weekend. Scott Pruitt promised to roll back Obama regulations "in an aggressive way" in a speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Saturday, singling out the Waters of the U.S. rule, the Clean Power Plan and regulations on methane emissions on federal lands as first in line for the chopping block.

Paraphrasing Yogi Berra, Pruitt told the appreciative crowd that "the future ain't what it used to be at EPA" as he promised structural changes at the agency and critiqued the Obama administration's focus on climate policies.

Some of Pruitt's promises could come true as early as today, as multiple reports suggest Trump will sign an order rolling back the Waters of the U.S. rule by Tuesday, with executive orders targeting the Clean Power Plan and Interior Department restrictions on coal leasing on federal lands expected to come later this week.

For a deeper dive:

EPA Funding: Axios, New York Times, Bloomberg, The Hill

Speech: Bloomberg, Newsweek, Reuters, The Guardian, The Hill

Executive Orders: WSJ, Reuters

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

In an ad released by Republican Voters Against Trump, former coronavirus task force member Olivia Troye roasted the president for his response. Republican Voters Against Trump / YouTube

Yet another former Trump administration staffer has come out with an endorsement for former Vice President Joe Biden, this time in response to President Donald Trump's handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Climate Group

Every September for the past 11 years, non-profit the Climate Group has hosted Climate Week NYC, a chance for business, government, activist and community leaders to come together and discuss solutions to the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A field of sunflowers near the Mehrum coal-fired power station, wind turbines and high-voltage lines in the Peine district of Germany on Aug. 3, 2020. Julian Stratenschulte / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Elliot Douglas

The coronavirus pandemic has altered economic priorities for governments around the world. But as wildfires tear up the west coast of the United States and Europe reels after one of its hottest summers on record, tackling climate change remains at the forefront of economic policy.

Read More Show Less
Monarch butterflies in Mexico's Oyamel forest in Michoacan, Mexico after migrating from Canada. Luis Acosta / AFP / Getty Images

By D. André Green II

One of nature's epic events is underway: Monarch butterflies' fall migration. Departing from all across the United States and Canada, the butterflies travel up to 2,500 miles to cluster at the same locations in Mexico or along the Pacific Coast where their great-grandparents spent the previous winter.

Read More Show Less
The 30th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony on Sept. 17 introduced ten new Ig Nobel Prize winners, each intended to make people "laugh then think." Improbable Research / YouTube

The annual Ig Nobel prizes were awarded Thursday by the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research for scientific experiments that seem somewhat absurd, but are also thought-provoking. This was the 30th year the awards have been presented, but the first time they were not presented at Harvard University. Instead, they were delivered in a 75-minute pre-recorded ceremony.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch