Quantcast

CSX Train Carrying 8,000 Tons of Coal Derails in Company's Second Wreck in 24 Hours

Energy

A train derailed early Thursday morning in Bowie, MD marking the second derailment for CSX Corp. in 24 hours.

CSX spokeswoman Kristin Seay told the Associated Press that about 10 cars of the train traveling from Cumberland, MD to Bowie derailed Thursday. The train had three locomotives and 63 railcars, all of which were carrying coal. The train originated from a coal mine in Pennsylvania. 

The train was carrying about 8,000 tons of coal.

The train was carrying 8,000 tons of coal. Photo credit: Bowie Volunteer Fire Department/Twitter

One of the train cars overturned, spilling its load of coal, but there were no injuries reported in the incident. CSX spokesman Gary Sease said the company would investigate the derailment. He said increased rain may have played a role, but it's too early to say.

"Weather will be just one of many factors that are part of the investigation in all of the accidents, Bowie and Lynchburg and Baltimore as well," Sease told the Baltimore Sun. "It's definitely a lot of rain in the region lately, but again our investigations and the NTSB's investigation in Lynchburg are just underway and nothing's been established yet."

Prince George's County officials said no "life safety concerns" arose from the incident.

About 200 miles away in Lynchburg, VA, a CSX train derailed Wednesday, resulting in thousands of gallons of crude oil spilling into the James River. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating that incident.

"This has got to be a wake-up call for federal authorities to protect people and the environment from these dangerous shipments,” Mollie Matteson of the Center for Biological Diversity said in a statement after the Lynchburg derailment.

“A massive increase in rail shipment of oil across the Northeast and much of the country has occurred with no public scrutiny to ensure our safety or protect the environment,” she said. “A moratorium is needed until a careful review can ensure safety measures are in place to avoid another tragic accident.”

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Thousands of Crude Oil Gallons Spill Into James River as Train Derails in Virginia

——–

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

New pine trees grow from the forest floor along the North Fork of the Flathead River on the western boundary of Glacier National Park on Sept. 16, 2019 near West Glacier, Montana. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

By Alex Kirby

New forests are an apparently promising way to tackle global heating: the trees absorb carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas from human activities. But there's a snag, because permanently lower river flows can be an unintended consequence.

Read More
Household actions lead to changes in collective behavior and are an essential part of social movements. Pixabay / Pexels

By Greg McDermid, Joule A Bergerson, Sheri Madigan

Hidden among all of the troubling environmental headlines from 2019 — and let's face it, there were plenty — was one encouraging sign: the world is waking up to the reality of climate change.

So now what?

Read More
Sponsored
Logging state in the U.S. is seen representing some of the consequences humans will face in the absence of concrete action to stop deforestation, pollution and the climate crisis. Mark Newman / Lonely Planet Images / Getty Images

Talk is cheap, says the acting executive secretary of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, who begged governments around the world to make sure that 2020 is not another year of conferences and empty promises, but instead is the year to take decisive action to stop the mass extinction of wildlife and the destruction of habitat-sustaining ecosystems, as The Guardian reported.

Read More
The people of Kiribati have been under pressure to relocate due to sea level rise. A young woman wades through the salty sea water that flooded her way home on Sept. 29, 2015. Jonas Gratzer / LightRocket via Getty Images

Refugees fleeing the impending effects of the climate crisis cannot be forced to return home, according to a new decision by the United Nations Human Rights Committee, as CNN reported. The new decision could open up a massive wave of legal claims by displaced people around the world.

Read More
The first day of the Strike WEF march on Davos on Jan. 18, 2020 near Davos, Switzerland. The activists want climate justice and think the WEF is for the world's richest and political elite only. Kristian Buus / In Pictures via Getty Images

By Ashutosh Pandey

Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg is returning to the Swiss ski resort of Davos for the 2020 World Economic Forum with a strong and clear message: put an end to the fossil fuel "madness."

Read More