Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Cowboys, Indians and Daryl Hannah Ride for Renewables

Energy
Cowboys, Indians and Daryl Hannah Ride for Renewables

Ride for Renewables

Actress and activist Daryl Hannah joined a unique alliance of cowboys and Indians fighting TransCanada’s Keystone XL tar sands pipeline proposal Oct. 27. More than a dozen horse riders and tribal elders joined the Keystone XL "Tour of Resistance" as it rolled through the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

Sicangu Lakota Hereditary Chief John Spotted Tail, who participated in the ride, said, “The non-Indian, they took the Indian land and left us on reservations. And now the non-Indian is having it done to him. And now you see the Indian and the non-Indian standing shoulder-to-shoulder fighting this pipeline. It’s pretty amazing to see this happen.”

Daryl Hannah said, “The Alberta tar sands are incredibly dangerous to our food security and water security.” She later added, “We really need President Obama to fulfill his promise to get us off what he called the tyranny of oil.”

Paul Siemens, a rancher from Draper, South Dakota who also joined the ride, said, “The fact that a foreign corporation has the power of eminent domain is what got me into this whole thing. They threaten pretty much everyone with eminent domain.”

Oglala Lakota grandmother and activist Debra White Plume, who also joined the ride, said, “TransCanada’s pipeline would cross hundreds of waters and the Ogallala Aquifer, which is the direct lifeblood for 2 million people in this country. All that destruction so a foreign corporation can make a profit?”

“The Ft. Laramie Treaty of 1868 is an active agreement with the U.S. government and we intend to enforce this supreme law to keep TransCanada’s destructive pipeline off our land,” explained Floyd Hand, Oglala Lakota Buffalo Chief and Black Hills Sioux Nation Treaty Council Delegate.

The solidarity ride is part of the “Tour of Resistance” being led by renewable energy advocate Tom Weis, who is traversing the 1,700-mile proposed pipeline route in his rocket trike to highlight threats to the Great Plains and the Ogallala Aquifer. Daryl Hannah, Debra White Plume and Tom Weis were among 1,253 people arrested earlier this summer in front of the White House protesting Keystone XL.

“Nothing about Keystone XL is in America’s national interest,” Weis concluded. “It’s time for President Obama to stand up and fight for America by rejecting TransCanada’s permit.”

For more information, click here.

An Edith's Checkerspot butterfly in Los Padres National Forest in Southern California. Patricia Marroquin / Moment / Getty Images

Butterflies across the U.S. West are disappearing, and now researchers say the climate crisis is largely to blame.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A wildfire burns in the Hollywood hills on July 19, 2016 in Hollywood, California. AaronP / Bauer-Griffin / GC Images

California faces another "critically dry year" according to state officials, and a destructive wildfire season looms on its horizon. But in a state that welcomes innovation, water efficacy approaches and drought management could replenish California, increasingly threatened by the climate's new extremes.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Wisdom is seen with her chick in Feb. 2021 at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Jon Brack / Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge / Flickr / CC 2.0

Wisdom the mōlī, or Laysan albatross, is the oldest wild bird known to science at the age of at least 70. She is also, as of February 1, a new mother.

Read More Show Less
Wind turbines in Norway. piola66 / E+ / Getty Images

By Hui Hu

Winter is supposed to be the best season for wind power – the winds are stronger, and since air density increases as the temperature drops, more force is pushing on the blades. But winter also comes with a problem: freezing weather.

Read More Show Less
Jaffa Port in Israel. theDOCK innovated the Israeli maritime space and kickstarted a boom in new technologies. Pixabay

While traditional investment in the ocean technology sector has been tentative, growth in Israeli maritime innovations has been exponential in the last few years, and environmental concern has come to the forefront.

Read More Show Less