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Court Rules Sewer District Can Move Forward with Stormwater Management Program

Court Rules Sewer District Can Move Forward with Stormwater Management Program

Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District

On Feb. 15, Cuyahoga County Court of Common Pleas Judge Thomas J. Pokorny issued an opinion in the case of Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District vs. Bath Township, Ohio, et al. (CV-10-714945).

This is the second ruling from Judge Pokorny reaffirming the Sewer District’s authority to implement a regional Stormwater Management Program; the first ruling occurred in April 2011.

The Feb. 15 ruling includes the following:

• The Sewer District’s Stormwater Management Program fee is authorized under Chapter 6119 of the Ohio Revised Code; the charges proposed are ruled a fee, and not a tax as the Defendants argued,

• Defendants’ Motion for Permanent Injunction was denied, and

• Judge Pokorny determined that the City of Hudson is a member of the Sewer District.

“The Court has decisively affirmed that the Sewer District not only has the authority to implement this program, but charge a fee for the services this program will provide,” said Julius Ciaccia, executive director, Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District. “The Sewer District’s Stormwater Management Program is a great demonstration of regionalism and I look forward to working with community leaders as we begin to address the region’s escalating stormwater problems with a progressive, forward-thinking attitude.”

Judge Pokorny requested the Sewer District address several proposed changes to the Stormwater Management Program, including an alternative community cost share formula, additional fee options for non-residential customers, engineering cost credits and the development of stormwater-related curriculum for schools.  The Court will hold a hearing with all associated parties regarding these proposed changes in the next 30 days.

The Sewer District filed the initial motion for declaratory judgment on Jan. 7, 2010, the same day the Sewer District’s Board of Trustees unanimously voted to adopt Title V, the section of the Sewer District’s Code of Regulations that details of the Stormwater Management Program.

About the Program

The Sewer District’s Stormwater Management Program will address flooding, erosion and water quality problems throughout its defined service area. In addition, the Sewer District will assume responsibility for millions of dollars of necessary maintenance along streams across the region.

The average homeowner within the Sewer District’s Service Area would be charged $4.75 per month, or $57 per year, to pay for stormwater-related construction projects and maintenance. The Sewer District has identified more than $220 million of needed construction projects, and detailed planning on some projects has already begun. These stormwater-related projects will provide relief to multiple communities within each watershed.

Click here for additional information about the Stormwater Management Program.

Click here for a copy of Judge Pokorny’s opinion.

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