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Couple's Quest to Eat Healthy on a Food Stamp Budget

Jack Carey is going to be a sophomore at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is an economics major interested in pursing a career in environmental economics. He writes for the CU Environmental Center blog site and lives in Costa Mesa, CA.

I attended a film screening of Food Stamped, a documentary that takes an in-depth look at the food system in our country, which many citizens find to be broken. The film follows an American couple on their quest to eat healthy and stay on a well-balanced diet while on a food stamp budget. Throughout the film, the filmmaker, Yoav Potash, and his wife, Shira, a nutrition specialist, travel the country discussing the problem amongst the company of U.S. government officials, nutritionists, food organizations and other folks living on a one-dollar-meal plan.

This hour long film brings about an important message to society with a friendly, entertaining presence. It explains the difficulty of eating healthy on food stamp benefits provided by the NSAP (the program introduced a National Policy for Social Assistance for the poor and aims at ensuring minimum national standard for social assistance). Regardless of the status of your job, education or cooking skills, this food stamp budget does not provide the capability to eat healthy with ease. For those who have negative attitudes towards low-income people using their benefits, this movie is a must-see.

 

This film is eye opening in how it delivers a message that must be heard with a calm, warm approach. Its message promotes an incentive to partake in activism rather than let ourselves be defeated by the unstable system that makes our food choices. Food Stamped examines this tough subject with the most delightful of attitudes. It is a must-see for anyone looking to be politically or socially active.

 

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