Quantcast

German Coronavirus Evacuee Describes Life in Quarantine

Health + Wellness

By Rebecca Staudenmaier

Yannik Weis was studying abroad in the Chinese city of Wuhan when a deadly new type of coronavirus broke out. He became one of over 100 people Germany evacuated from the area over the weekend.

Although he and many other German evacuees are feeling healthy and in good spirits, Weis told DW on Monday that coming back to Germany in light of the outbreak had been "stressful."


He and 114 other evacuees are being kept in quarantine at a military base in the town of Germersheim, which is 120 kilometers (75 miles) south of Frankfurt. Weis said that they've been treated well at the base and that there "is a lot of medical support."

"If we leave our rooms, we have to wear a mask. Of course we are allowed to go outside to get some fresh air, but all the time we have to wear masks," Weis said.

Two of the German evacuees who were on the flight with Weis ended up testing positive for the virus and are currently being treated at a hospital in Frankfurt.

"Everybody in the airplane wore masks all the time. So I think the risk of getting infected there was very very small," Weis said.

He added that he thinks the quarantine is a necessary step in order to stop possible spread of the outbreak.

Empty Streets 'but No Panic' in Wuhan

Prior to the outbreak and the subsequent orders to remain in doors, Weis said the busy metropolis of Wuhan was "full of life."

"Everything was full of people. And suddenly after the outbreak ... the streets were empty," Weis noted.

He added that, despite the sudden shift in daily life in the city, people reacted calmly to the changes.

"Everyone was very silent and calm, but there was definitely no panic," he said.

There have been 10 confirmed coronavirus cases in Germany so far, most of which are based in the southern state of Bavaria.

China has effectively shut down the city of Wuhan and many surrounding provinces and municipalities in a bid to halt the spread of the virus.

At least 361 people have died from the coronavirus so far, surpassing the SARS epidemic that left 249 dead between 2002 and 2003.

More than 17,000 people in China are currently infected, with more than 24 countries also reporting cases.

Reposted with permission from DW.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
The new greenhouse will accelerate Lufa's mission to grow food. Lufa

By Sean Fleming

  • The world's largest rooftop greenhouse is in Montreal, Canada.
  • It measures more than 15,000m2 and produces more than 11,000kg of food per week.
  • The company behind it had to hire 200 new employees due to pandemic-driven demand.

Can you grow enough produce for an entire city in rooftop greenhouses? Two entrepreneurs in Montreal, Canada, believe it might be possible.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch joins Fabien Cousteau to remove marine debris in the Florida Keys and talk about the future of the oceans. Tiffany Duong / Ocean Rebels

Much of what we've been able to learn about the underwater world has built on the legacy of underwater explorer and pioneer Jacques Yves Cousteau. In 1943, Cousteau invented the aqua-lung, which completed his self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA). This technology forever changed how humans interact with the blue world and remains the precursor of modern-day scuba diving equipment.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Environmental activists carry a large snake pipeline as they protest against the Enbridge Line 3 oil pipeline on May 7, 2021 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

From fake oil spills in Washington, D.C. and New York City to a "people mural" in Seattle spelling out "Defund Line 3," climate and Indigenous protesters in 50 U.S. cities and across seven other countries spanning four continents took to the streets on Friday for a day of action pushing 20 banks to ditch the controversial tar sands pipeline.

Read More Show Less
Archeologists made their discoveries in the Karonga District in Northern Malawi. David Wright / University of Oslo

More evidence has emerged that humans have been altering the environment for much longer than the current climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Trending
A gas flare at an oil well site outside Williston, North Dakota on July 26, 2013. Andrew Burton / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

The critical importance of reducing global methane emissions, including those generated by the fossil fuel industry, is more significant than previously understood, according to a report published Thursday by the United Nations Environment Program.

Read More Show Less