Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

World's Biggest Brands Join Ambitious New Packaging Model

Business
World's Biggest Brands Join Ambitious New Packaging Model
Häagen-Dazs' new reusable stainless steel double-walled ice cream container. Nestlé

Beach cleanups around the world show that the biggest brands are the biggest producers of plastic trash.

Facing mounting public pressure to curb their environmental footprints, some of the world's largest food, beverage and consumer goods companies have partnered with recycling giant TerraCycle to launch an ambitious e-commerce platform to tackle single-use waste: Loop.


The program—a modern spin on the classic milkman model—was unveiled this week at the World Economic Forum in Davos.

Here's how it works. Goods such as Pantene shampoo, Tropicana orange juice and Häagen-Dazs ice cream come in sturdy, reusable glass bottles or stainless steel containers. Instead of throwing away the packaging once you're through with them, drop the empties into a shipping tote and schedule a pick-up from your home. The items are then collected, cleaned, refilled and returned in a shipping tote for reuse.

The idea is to eliminate packaging waste and to "greatly improve the product experience and the convenience in how we shop," as TerraCycle CEO Tom Szaky said in a press release.

"Through Loop, consumers will be able to responsibly consume products in specially-designed durable, reusable or fully recyclable packaging," he added.

Partners include Procter & Gamble, Nestlé, PepsiCo, Unilever, Mars Petcare, The Clorox Company, The Body Shop, Coca-Cola, Mondelēz, Danone and other firms.

Procter & Gamble introduces reusable, refillable packaging for some of its most popular products.

The service will launch in May with projects in Paris and the New York/New Jersey/Pennsylvania area, followed by a UK program in 2019, and then Toronto, Tokyo and California in the following year, according to Reuters.

Other launch partners include shipper United Parcel Service and European retailers Carrefour and Tesco Plc.

Recycling was once touted as one of the "three Rs" of preventing waste. But recycling is not the answer to our waste problem, and China's ban on foreign recyclables has left many countries including the U.S. with growing stockpiles of trash. It's clear we have to think outside our blue recycling bin.

"We realized that recycling and using recycled content is about trying to do the best you can with waste, but it's not solving the foundational reason we have waste," Szaky told GreenBiz. "We did a lot of reflection on that and realized that the foundational cause of garbage is disposability and single-use. We tried to come up with a way to solve for disposability but maintain the virtues of disposability, which are convenience and affordability."

Eat Just's cell-based chicken nugget is now served at Singapore restaurant 1880. Eat Just, Inc.

At a time of impending global food scarcity, cell-based meats and seafood have been heralded as the future of food.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

New Zealand sea lions are an endangered species and one of the rarest species of sea lions in the world. Art Wolfe / Photodisc / Getty Images

One city in New Zealand knows what its priorities are.

Dunedin, the second largest city on New Zealand's South Island, has closed a popular road to protect a mother sea lion and her pup, The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less

Trending


piyaset / iStock / Getty Images Plus

In an alarming new study, scientists found that climate change is already harming children's diets.

Read More Show Less
Wildfires within the Arctic Circle in Alaska on June 4, 2020. Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data processed by Pierre Markuse. CC BY 2.0

By Jeff Masters, Ph.D.

Earth had its second-warmest year on record in 2020, just 0.02 degrees Celsius (0.04°F) behind the record set in 2016, and 0.98 degrees Celsius (1.76°F) above the 20th-century average, NOAA reported January 14.

Read More Show Less

In December of 1924, the heads of all the major lightbulb manufacturers across the world met in Geneva to concoct a sinister plan. Their talks outlined limits on how long all of their lightbulbs would last. The idea is that if their bulbs failed quickly customers would have to buy more of their product. In this video, we're going to unpack this idea of purposefully creating inferior products to drive sales, a symptom of late-stage capitalism that has since been coined planned obsolescence. And as we'll see, this obsolescence can have drastic consequences on our wallets, waste streams, and even our climate.

Read More Show Less