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Congress Needs to Focus on Real Climate Cliff, Not Manufactured Fiscal Cliff

Climate

Forecast the Facts

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Forecast the Facts, the climate accountability group behind ClimateSilence.org, announced the launch of ClimateCliff.org today, an interactive site that contrasts the very real “climate cliff” with the manufactured “fiscal cliff.”

Constituents can take action through the site through twitter and a petition that has already garnered 10,000 signatures to demand their local members of Congress and Pres. Obama address the real cliff. Follow the action through the hashtag #climatecliff on Twitter.

"Moral indignation from Congress and the White House around the fiscal cliff is bizarre given their inaction on carbon pollution that will affect America for centuries,” said Brad Johnson, campaign manager for Forecast the Facts. “While Congress debates abstract, manufactured problems, everyday Americans from the survivors of superstorm Sandy to drought-stricken Midwestern farmers are feeling the pain of a changing climate.“

The petition on the site calls on President Obama and Congress to address the climate cliff. It draws attention to the climate crisis as a source of the nation’s current fiscal challenges, and compares the economic costs of inaction with the benefits of swift climate action.

“Let’s be honest: the real ceiling we face is the carbon ceiling, and the real debt is the carbon debt,” continued Johnson. “If Congress wants to debate cuts, they should look no further than the $10 billion in corporate welfare they give annually to the fossil fuel industry. If President Obama seeks to raise funds, he should claw back the $1 trillion in annual revenue the top five oil companies alone make from poisoning our future.”

Some members of Congress are already speaking out on the climate cliff. House Energy Committee member Rep. Ed Markey (D-MA) warned recently that “going over the climate cliff” would cause us to "plunge into an abyss of impacts that we cannot reverse.”

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

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