Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Company Lets You Solarize Battery-Powered Devices With This Kit

Business

We've seen solar picnic tables, solar lights and even rumblings that Apple might solarize its devices, but how about incorporating renewable energy into one of our favorite handheld gadgets?

Even if you can manage to live without a remote, there's a good chance that one of your family members or friends can't. New Jersey-based Sparkle Labs is betting on that—along with solar's overall growth—and selling its SunMod Solar Hacking Kit online.

The SunMod kit's 4.8V flexible solar cell can convert most small battery-powered devices into a solar energy users. Photo credit: Sparkle Labs

Though the company uses a TV remote to show how the product works, the kit allows a person to easily hack any AA- or AAA-battery-powered device to make it solar powered. Once the flexible 4.8-volt solar cell and its metal connectors are attached, the sun's rays will charge remotes, iPod speakers, small toys and more, eliminating the need to buy more batteries.

There are plenty of videos on YouTube and other sites that provide the steps to hack a device and power it with a similar solar cell, but Sparkle Labs is attempting to make the process a bit easier, decreasing the chances for any mishaps along the way. Sparkle Labs' store says the product is "coming soon" and retailer Grand St.'s site says the kit will be available in April 2013.

Here's a video the company posted online when it first created the product:

Sparkle Labs was founded in 2005 after founders Ariel Churi and Amy Parness began collaborating on inventions at New York University. The company's products are available on sites like Amazon and at various science centers and museums across the country.

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Zak Smith

It is pretty amazing that in this moment when the COVID-19 outbreak has much of the country holed up in their homes binging Netflix, the most watched show in America over the last few weeks has been focused on wildlife trade — which scientists believe is the source of the COVID-19 pandemic. Make no mistake: Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness is about wildlife trade and other aspects of wildlife exploitation, just as surely as the appearance of Ebola, SARS, MERS, avian flu and probably COVID-19 in humans is a result of wildlife exploitation. As a conservationist, this is one of the things I've been thinking about while watching Tiger King. Here are five more:

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Hector Chapa

With the coronavirus pandemic quickly spreading, U.S. health officials have changed their advice on face masks and now recommend people wear cloth masks in public areas where social distancing can be difficult, such as grocery stores.

But can these masks be effective?

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Jörg Carstensen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Carey Gillam

Bayer AG is reneging on negotiated settlements with several U.S. law firms representing thousands of plaintiffs who claim exposure to Monsanto's Roundup herbicides caused them to develop non-Hodgkin lymphoma, sources involved in the litigation said on Friday.

Read More Show Less
Tom Werner / DigitalVision / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

With many schools now closed due to the current COVID-19 outbreak, you may be looking for activities to keep your children active, engaged, and entertained.

Although numerous activities can keep kids busy, cooking is one of the best choices, as it's both fun and educational.

Read More Show Less
In Germany's Hunsrück village of Schorbach, numerous photovoltaic systems are installed on house roofs, on Sept. 19, 2019. Thomas Frey / Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Germany's target for renewable energy sources to deliver 65% of its consumed electricity by 2030 seemed on track Wednesday, with 52% of electricity coming from renewables in 2020's first quarter. Renewable energy advocates, however, warned the trend is imperiled by slowdowns in building new wind and solar plants.

Read More Show Less