Quantcast

Company Lets You Solarize Battery-Powered Devices With This Kit

Business

We've seen solar picnic tables, solar lights and even rumblings that Apple might solarize its devices, but how about incorporating renewable energy into one of our favorite handheld gadgets?

Even if you can manage to live without a remote, there's a good chance that one of your family members or friends can't. New Jersey-based Sparkle Labs is betting on that—along with solar's overall growth—and selling its SunMod Solar Hacking Kit online.

The SunMod kit's 4.8V flexible solar cell can convert most small battery-powered devices into a solar energy users. Photo credit: Sparkle Labs

Though the company uses a TV remote to show how the product works, the kit allows a person to easily hack any AA- or AAA-battery-powered device to make it solar powered. Once the flexible 4.8-volt solar cell and its metal connectors are attached, the sun's rays will charge remotes, iPod speakers, small toys and more, eliminating the need to buy more batteries.

There are plenty of videos on YouTube and other sites that provide the steps to hack a device and power it with a similar solar cell, but Sparkle Labs is attempting to make the process a bit easier, decreasing the chances for any mishaps along the way. Sparkle Labs' store says the product is "coming soon" and retailer Grand St.'s site says the kit will be available in April 2013.

Here's a video the company posted online when it first created the product:

Sparkle Labs was founded in 2005 after founders Ariel Churi and Amy Parness began collaborating on inventions at New York University. The company's products are available on sites like Amazon and at various science centers and museums across the country.

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Despite huge strides in improving the lives of children since 1989, many of the world's poorest are being left behind, the United Nations children's fund UNICEF warned Monday.

Read More Show Less
At least seven people have died in a Bangladesh pipeline explosion. Youtube screenshot

At least seven people were killed when a gas pipeline exploded in Bangladesh Sunday, and another 25 were injured, the Associated Press reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The Shell Puget Sound Refinery in Anacortes, Washington. John Westrock / Flickr

The Washington Department of Ecology responded to an oil spill that took place Friday night when a Crowley Maritime Barge was transferring five million gallons of oil to the Shell Puget Sound Refinery, CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Claire L. Jarvis

A ruckus over biofuels has been brewing in Iowa.

Read More Show Less
Serena and Venus Williams have been known to follow a vegan diet. Edwin Martinez / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Whitney E. Akers

  • "The Game Changers" is a new documentary on Netflix that posits a vegan diet can improve athletic performance in professional athletes.

  • Limited studies available show that the type of diet — plant-based or omnivorous — doesn't give you an athletic advantage.

  • We talked to experts about what diet is the best for athletic performance.

Packed with record-setting athletes displaying cut physiques and explosive power, "The Game Changers," a new documentary on Netflix, has a clear message: Vegan is best.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
An illegally trafficked tiger skull and pelt. Ryan Moehring / USFWS

By John R. Platt

When it comes to solving problems related to wildlife trade, there are an awful lot of "sticky widgets."

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE

Inflammation can be both good and bad.

On one hand, it helps your body defend itself from infection and injury. On the other hand, chronic inflammation can lead to weight gain and disease.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Dan Nosowitz

It's no secret that the past few years have been disastrous for the American farming industry.

Read More Show Less