Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Companies, Colleges and Cities Top EPA's Top 100 Renewable Energy User Rankings

Business

It's like a badge of honor to say that you power your building with renewable energy, but it's quite another feat to be recognized for it by the federal government.

Various businesses, organizations, universities, cities and more know what that's like now that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has revealed its top 100 Green Power Partnership rankings. Each entity on the list uses clean energy sources like wind and solar and is also member of the EPA's Green Power Partnership.

Here are the top 10, along with the kilowatt hours per year of green energy, the resources used, who provides and the percentage of total electricity it accounts for: 

Click the image for the EPA's full top-100 list of Green Power Partners. Graphic credit: EPA

“By using green power, these companies and organizations are showing that business can flourish while taking meaningful steps to reduce carbon pollution,” said Gina McCarthy, EPA administrator.

The partners are ranked by kilowatt hours, which should make for some interesting discussion. Walmart, which has been criticized for its emissions, ranked sixth on the list despite green power only accounting for 3 percent of its operations. That's because it uses more than 650 million kilowatt hours of clean energy per year.

The City of Houston ranked No. 9, while Washington D.C., Austin and Dallas all made the top 20. Entire states made the list, too. Those include Illinois and Wisconsin.

The inclusion of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, the park and public schools systems of Chicago, as well as Ohio State, Georgetown and American universities shows just how diverse this list is. The EPA also issued individual lists for the top retailers, universities and more.

At No. 28, the University of Pennsylvania is the top college listed in the EPA rankings for the seventh year in a row. Photo credit: neverbutterfly/Flickr Creative Commons

“Making cleaner choices to power our communities, institutions and businesses reduces the pollution that contributes to climate change, protects America's health and environment, and supports continued growth in the green power sector," McCarthy said.

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Find out Which Businesses, Cities and Universities Use 100 Percent Green Energy

Which Companies Are Greening the Internet?

Top Companies Invested in Solar Energy Projects

 ——–

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Looking across the Houston Ship Canal at the ExxonMobil Refinery, Baytown, Texas. Roy Luck, CC BY 2.0

By Nick Cunningham

A growing number of refineries around the world are either curtailing operations or shutting down entirely as the oil market collapses.

Read More Show Less
Traffic moves across the Brooklyn Bridge on Aug. 2, 2018 in New York City. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

The Trump administration is expected to unveil its final replacement of Obama-era fuel-efficiency standards for cars and light trucks Tuesday in a move likely to pump nearly a billion more tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere over the lifetime of those less-efficient vehicles.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
U.S. President Donald Trump listens as Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases speaks in the Rose Garden for the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House on March 29 in Washington, DC. Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Just over a month after proclaiming that the number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. would soon "be down to close to zero," President Donald Trump said during a press briefing on the White House lawn Sunday that limiting U.S. deaths from the pandemic to between 100,000 and 200,000 people would mean his administration and the country as a whole did "a very good job."

Read More Show Less
Dicamba is having a devastating impact in Arkansas and neighboring states. A farmer in Mississippi County, Arkansas looks at rows of soybean plants affected by dicamba. The Washington Post / Getty Images

Documents unearthed in a lawsuit brought by a Missouri farmer who claimed that Monsanto and German chemical maker BASF's dicamba herbicide ruined his peach orchard revealed that the two companies knew their new agricultural seed and chemical system would likely damage many U.S. farms, according to documents seen by The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Washington State Governor Jay Inslee and other leaders speak to the press on March 28, 2020 in Seattle. Karen Ducey / Getty Images

Washington State has seen a slowdown in the infection rate of the novel coronavirus, for now, suggesting that early containment strategies have been effective, according to the Seattle NBC News affiliate.

Read More Show Less