Quantcast
Food
Pixabay

Our Food Is Killing the Planet — But It Doesn’t Have To

By John R. Platt

The world needs to change the way it eats, not just as individuals but as a society.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Insights + Opinion
The Edwards Dam is removed on the Kennebec River in Maine. NRCM

How Removing One Maine Dam 20 Years Ago Changed Everything

By Tara Lohan

More than 1,000 people lined the banks of the Kennebec River in Augusta, Maine, on July 1, 1999. They were there to witness a rebirth.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
Earth photo: NASA

The Four Most Thought-Provoking Environmental Books Coming in February

By John R. Platt

This month sees the publication of four striking new environmental books, at least two of which promise to make a stir.

Keep reading... Show less
Animals
A caterpillar carrying parasitic wasp eggs. John Flannery / CC BY-SA 2.0

Why We Should Care About Parasites — and Their Extinction

By John R. Platt

Parasite. To most people, the very word is cause for fear or disgust—which is a shame, because most parasites don't actually harm their hosts. In fact their very existence is a sign of a healthy ecosystem, as I discussed on a recent segment of the Green Divas podcast. We also talked about the values some parasites provide, what we can learn from them, and what we lose when they go extinct.

Keep reading... Show less
Insights + Opinion
Steve Hillebrand / USFWS

Trump Administration Drills Down on Alaska’s Arctic Refuge

By Tim Lydon

The Trump administration is barreling ahead with plans to drill for oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, the largest refuge in the country and an area of global ecological importance.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Politics
An offshore oil drilling rig. Arbyreed / CC BY-NC 2.0

Is the Trump Administration ‘Gaming the Shutdown’ to Serve Energy and Hunting Special Interests?

By Tara Lohan

Two years into the Trump administration, its attacks on environmental regulations, policy and science are already well documented. But the current partial government shutdown, now more than a month long, provides a unique lens through which to view the administration's priorities. The list of what isn't being done is long and troubling, but equally concerning is what is being done during the shutdown.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
Virginia's highway department prepares for snowy weather with a mix of salt and abrasives. D. Allen Covey / VDOT / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

More Salt in Our Water Is Creating Scary New ‘Chemical Cocktails’

By Tara Lohan

Gene Likens has been studying forest and aquatic ecosystems for more than half a century. In that time he's seen a change in the chemistry of our surface waters—including an increase in the alkalinity and salinity of waterways—something he and his colleagues have dubbed "freshwater salinization syndrome."

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Climate
Brazil, Pantanal, water lilies. Nat Photos / DigitalVision / Getty Images Plus

Saving the World’s Largest Tropical Wetland

Most people have heard of the Amazon, South America's famed rainforest and hub of biological diversity. Less well known, though no less critical, is the Pantanal, the world's largest tropical wetland.

Like the Amazon, the Pantanal is ecologically important and imperiled. Located primarily in Brazil, it also stretches into neighboring Bolivia and Paraguay. Covering an area larger than England at more than 70,000 square miles, the massive wetland provides irreplaceable ecosystem services that include the regulation of floodwaters, nutrient renewal, river flow for navigability, groundwater recharge and carbon sequestration. The wetland also supports the economies of the four South American states it covers.

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
Vial containing swab from a deceased duck, collected for testing during the 2014-2015 avian influenza outbreak. © 2015 Erica Cirino, used with permission.

Could Trump’s Government Shutdown Cause Outbreaks of Wildlife Disease?

By Erica Cirino

The current U.S. government shutdown could worsen ongoing wildlife disease outbreaks or even delay responses to new epidemics, according to federal insiders and outside experts who work with federal wildlife employees.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored