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A family wears face masks as they walk through the smoke filled streets after the Thomas wildfire swept through Ventura, California on Dec. 6, 2017. MARK RALSTON / AFP / Getty Images

How to Protect Your Children From Wildfire Smoke

By Cecilia Sierra-Heredia

We're very careful about what our kids eat, but what about the air they breathe?

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Native American tribes believe Bears Ears is the last of undisturbed sacred lands. Mark Stevens, CC BY-NC-SA

Why Native Americans Struggle to Protect Their Sacred Places

By Rosalyn R. LaPier

Forty years ago the U.S. Congress passed the American Indian Religious Freedom Act so that Native Americans could practice their faith freely and that access to their sacred sites would be protected. This came after a 500-year-long history of conquest and coercive conversion to Christianity had forced Native Americans from their homelands.

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Climate
MARK GARLICK / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY / Getty Images

Hothouse Earth: Here’s What the Science Actually Does – and Doesn’t – Say

By Richard Betts

A new scientific paper proposing a scenario of unstoppable climate change has gone viral, thanks to its evocative description of a "Hothouse Earth."

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Health
Dewayne Johnson (C) hugs one of his attorneys, next to lawyer and member of his legal team Robert F Kennedy Jr (R), after the verdict was read in the case against Monsanto at the Superior Court Of California in San Francisco, California on Aug. 10. JOSH EDELSON / AFP / Getty Images

Jury Finds Monsanto Liable in the First Roundup Cancer Trial – Here’s What Could Happen Next

By Richard G. "Bugs" Stevens

In the first of many pending lawsuits to go to trial, a jury in San Francisco concluded on Aug. 10 that the plaintiff had developed cancer from exposure to Roundup, Monsanto's widely used herbicide, and ordered the company to pay US$289 million in damages.

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Joe Raedle / Getty Images

What Is Causing Florida’s Algae Crisis? 5 Questions Answered

By Karl Havens

Editor's note: Two large-scale algae outbreaks in Florida are killing fish and threatening public health. Along the southwest coast, one of the longest-lasting red tide outbreaks in the state's history is affecting more than 100 miles of beaches. Meanwhile, discharges of polluted fresh water from Lake Okeechobee and polluted local runoff water from the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee watersheds have caused blooms of blue-green algae in downstream estuaries on both coasts. Karl Havens, a professor at the University of Florida and director of the Florida Sea Grant Program, explains what's driving this two-pronged disaster.

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Oceans
Milos Bicanski / Stringer / Getty Images

What’s the Value of a Clean Beach? Here’s How Economists Do the Numbers

By Timothy Haab

Millions of Americans head outdoors in the summer, whether for a day at a nearby lake or a monthlong road trip. For environmental economists like me, decisions by vacationers and outdoor recreators offer clues to a challenging puzzle: estimating what environmental resources are worth.

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Health
Philippe Huguen / Getty Images

CBD Oil: What You Need to Know

By Yewande Okuleye

There's plenty of anecdotal evidence that Cannabidiol (CBD) oil—a concentrated oily extract made from cannabis—can help treat a variety of ailments. It's said to help with everything from epileptic seizures to opioid addiction, PTSD to arthritis.

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Bill Pugliano / Stringer / Getty Images

Can Elon Musk Fix Flint’s Water?

By Fiona E. McNeill

The Michigan community of Flint has become a byword for lead poisoning. Elon Musk recently entered the fray. He tweeted a promise to pay to fix the water in any house in Flint that had water contamination above acceptable levels set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Health
Bob Berg / Getty Images

How Summer and Diet Damage Your DNA, and What You Can Do

By Adam Barsouk

Today, your body will accumulate quadrillions of new injuries in your DNA. The constant onslaught of many forms of damage, some of which permanently mutates your genes, could initiate cancer and prove fatal. Yet all is not doomed: The lives we lead determine how well our cells can handle this daily molecular erosion.

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