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Animals
A coyote photographed by the motion-activated camera along the Los Angles River. National Park Service

Cities: Where the Wild Things Are

By Jeff Turrentine

I used to live in a hilly, temperate corner of the American west, right near the banks of a meandering river. On late-evening walks with my two dogs, I would routinely encounter all manner of economy-size mammalian wildlife: skunks, raccoons, opossums, coyotes. Sightings of a mountain lion in the area had occurred more than once, though my dogs and I were perfectly happy never to have chanced upon him. During the day, it wasn't unusual to see red-tailed hawks or turkey vultures circling overhead, or rigid V-formations of migrating Canada geese, or even the occasional egret or blue heron swooping down as it made its descent to its riparian home.

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Animals
Alessio Viora / Marine Photobank

A Single Discarded Fishing Net Can Keep Killing for Centuries

By Jason Bittel

Divers off the coast of the Cayman Islands last month came face to face with a ghoulish sight: a gigantic mass of abandoned fishing gear and its catch. The monstrous net, as wide and deep as the Hollywood sign is tall, drifted just below the water's surface with tendrils that teemed with hundreds of dead and dying fish and sharks.

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Climate
Irma Omerhodzic

A Year of Climate Change, as (Not) Presented by the EPA

By Jeff Turrentine

"This page is being updated." So begins the message that has greeted visitors to the climate change page on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) website for just over a year now. "We are currently updating our website to reflect EPA's priorities under the leadership of President Trump and Administrator Pruitt."

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Animals

America’s Last Woodland Caribou Herd Is Down to Just Three Animals

By Jason Bittel

Most people associate reindeer with the North Pole. And it's true, the animals also known as caribou tend to live in remote, wintry landscapes most Americans will never see. But did you know that caribou once roamed as far south as Minnesota, Michigan, Vermont and New York? And that the Selkirk woodland caribou herd still spends part of each year in Idaho and Washington?

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"Sky Opening," 2018, Mary O'Brien and Daniel McCormick's new sculpture in Interlochen, Michigan. Mary A. O'Brien

These Sculptures Help Heal the Planet

By Patrick Rogers

Sky Opening, a new sculpture embedded in the woods of northern Michigan, is as stark and dramatic as its name sounds. A visitor approaching from an old logging road that leads through pine trees as tall and straight as telephone poles is suddenly confronted by a stab of light and air that slices through the dark shade of the forest. Rising from the ground in a narrow clearing are dozens of tree trunks. They range in height from just about eye level to 90 feet tall, all sliced at an angle and bloodied with the red flagging paint used by loggers. Together, these 150 trees form a ceremonial entry that swoops toward the ground and then rises back up to the treetops and the welcoming sky.

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"On the Edge." Jessie Moore

A Montana Artist Makes Objects of Beauty Inspired by Natural Disasters

By Ingrid Abramovitch

Last summer, when wildfires burned out of control in Montana and other western states, Richard M. Parrish responded the best way he knows how: by creating artwork to document the devastation. Parrish, an internationally acclaimed glass artist, ascended over the parched landscape near his studio in Bozeman, Montana, in a small propeller plane. He then used these aerial observations to create a series of fused-glass works based on topographical maps—three of which are currently on view in The Tipping Point: Artists Address Climate Change, a group exhibition at the Rockland Center for the Arts in West Nyack, New York.

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Demian DinéYazhi´'s "Rez Dog, Rez Dirt," 2013. Courtesy Demian DinéYazhi´

Haunting Views of a Planet Declining Faster for Some Communities Than for Others

By Ingrid Abramovitch

Carolina Caycedo's nets hang and sway from the ceiling of the Whitney Museum of American Art, each one distinct in shape, color and composition. They range from softly rounded to elongated and geometric; some are white, while others have been dyed in bright oranges and reds. Caught in their knotted structures are objects that speak to a vibrant world: embroideries, seeds, dried plants, candles, framed religious images and musical instruments. "They are atarrayas, fishing nets that you throw by hand, and I think super beautiful," said the artist. "They were given to me by fisherfolk in Colombia near the Magdalena River, not far from where my father has a farm."

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A parasitic wasp like the ones used in the experiment attacks a pair of aphids. Dirk Sanders

New Study Is First to Demonstrate That Biodiversity Inoculates Against Extinction

By Jason Bittel

Biodiversity has long been touted as important for staving off extinction. The more kinds of critters you have, in other words, the less likely any one of them—or a whole bunch of them—will disappear forever.

The trouble is, no one has ever really demonstrated this idea in a lab setting. Until now.

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Installation view of "Liza Ryan: Antarctica" at L.A.'s Kayne Griffin Corcoran gallery. Flying Studio

Liza Ryan’s Altered Images Summon the Terrible Beauty of Antarctica

By Patrick Rogers

Liza Ryan's trip to Antarctica for her 50th birthday was the journey of a lifetime, a dream she had been working toward for years. In preparation for the two-week visit in 2016, the Los Angeles–based artist did her homework, reading Peter Matthiessen's End of the World and a book about British explorer Ernest Shackleton's ill-fated voyage to the South Pole aboard the sailing ship Endurance.

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