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Oceans
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Oceans Highlighted in Dire White House Climate Report: 3 Things to Know

By Amy McDermott

Last week, the White House released the Fourth National Climate Assessment, a dire warning on climate change risks and impacts across the U.S. The report does not mince words. In 29 chapters and five appendices, it outlines grave threats to life, livelihoods, national security and the U.S. economy, caused by sea level rise, extreme temperatures, severe storms, fires, flooding and other climatic changes.

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Oceans

Magnus Larsson / iStock / Getty Images Plus

What Ocean Microplastics Are Really Made of

By Rachel Kaufman

Humans produce hundreds of millions of tons of plastic every year. As much as 12.7 million metric tons of it ends up in the ocean, where it can transport pathogens, or be mistaken for food by hungry animals.

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Oceans
To predict the nutrient content of fish, a new study turned to shared evolutionary history. Oceana / Eduardo Sorensen

How Nutritious Is That Fish? To Find Out, Ask Its Relatives

By Amy McDermott

Eels and anchovies don't look or act much alike. One is sinuous and shy, the other a bright flash of silver in a school of thousands. Yet the two fish are cousins, both loaded with zinc.

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Animals
Southern Resident killer whale. Rachael Griffin / iStock / Getty Images

These Whales Are Suffering a Slow-Motion Extinction

By Joshua Learn

Whether southern resident killer whales, North Atlantic right whales or Maui's dolphins, a handful of cetacean species are facing the prospect of a slow-motion extinction they can't breed their way out of.

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Oceans
Chile's once-common hake have been decimated by waves of legal and illegal fishing. Claudia Pool / Oceana

Loved to Death: How Pirate Fishing Decimates Chile’s Favorite Fish

By Allison Guy

When Hugo Arancibia Farías was a child, his mother, like most mothers in central Chile, visited the weekly market to buy common hake, a white-fleshed relative of cod. She usually served it fried, Arancibia recalled with relish. "It was very cheap," he said, "and very popular."

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Chile's small-scale fishers are squeezed, but a renewed interest in native foods offers hope. Claudio Almarza / Oceana

Can a Locavore Seafood Movement Save Chile’s Traditional Fishers?

By Allison Guy

When Carlos Castro was young, he didn't plan on following his dad and granddad into fishing. Like a lot of teenagers in the 1970s, Castro dreamt of kung fu. Bruce Lee was more his style than the family business.

Castro swam laps to shape up back then, dodging boats in the bracingly cold bay of Valparaiso, a port city in central Chile. Forty years later, he still plies those waters, driving one of the boats he used to swim past. Castro, a youthful 56 in white trainers and Nike gear, became a fisherman after all.

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Oceans
Russian and U.S. students carry bug spray for the mosquitoes, bear spray for the grizzlies and notebooks for the salmon science, while studying in Alaska's backcountry. John Simeone on behalf of WWF

Sharing Knowledge and Salmon Across the Bering Sea

By Amy McDermott

At the height of the Alaskan summer, a troupe of students hiked up the middle of a shallow creek. Undergraduates and grads from the University of Washington, the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Kamchatka State Technical University in eastern Russia carried handheld clickers to count the multitudes of salmon thrashing upstream to spawn. Some of the students spoke English, others Russian, but they all came to see salmon: fish that their two countries share.

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Scientists are beginning to tally just how much food women are bringing home from the ocean. Oceana / Instagram

Want to Protect the Oceans? Empower Women

By Amy McDermott

Picture someone fishing, and a woman probably doesn't come to mind. Men are the face of fisheries work, even though women are its backbone in much of the world.

Half of seafood workers are female. Women net fish, spear octopus, dig clams, dive for abalone and pack and process seafood, yet are consistently denied a voice in fisheries management.

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Climate
Oceana / Carlos Minguell

​Climate Change Could Ignite 'Fish Wars,' But It Doesn't Have To


By Amy Mcdermott

Wars are coming. They will begin with fish. Or so it would seem, as swirling schools of little bass and other seafood species dart across political lines this century.

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