Quantcast
Climate
Pexels

Tourism Responsible for 8% of Global Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Study Finds

By Daisy Dunne

Worldwide tourism accounted for 8 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions from 2009 to 2013, new research finds, making the sector a bigger polluter than the construction industry.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Climate
Pixabay

Deforestation Has Driven Up Hottest Day Temperatures, Study Says

By Daisy Dunn

The average hottest day of the year in Europe, North America and Asia has been made significantly more intense as a result of deforestation since the start of the industrial revolution, a study finds.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
A turtle swims over the bleached coral at Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef in February 2016. The Ocean Agency / XL Catlin Seaview Survey / Richard Vevers

Great Barrier Reef at ‘Unprecedented’ Risk of Collapse After Major Bleaching Event

By Daisy Dunne

The record-breaking marine heatwave in 2016 across the Great Barrier Reef has left much of the coral ecosystem at an "unprecedented" risk of collapse, research shows.

A new study published in Nature finds that the surge in sea temperatures during the 2016 bleaching event led to an immediate and long-lasting die-off of coral.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
Sea ice and Arctic mountains of Raudfjord, Spitsbergen. onurbwa51 / Flickr

Arctic Sea Ice Hits Second-Lowest Winter Peak on Record

By Robert McSweeney

Arctic sea ice has experienced its maximum extent for the year, reaching 14.48 million square kilometers (approximately 5.59 million square miles) on March 17—the second smallest in the 39-year satellite record.

The provisional data from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) shows the 2018 winter peak only narrowly avoided taking 2017's record.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
Clouds over Llanymynech, Wales, UK. Dave McGlinchey / Flickr

Solar Geoengineering: Risk of ‘Termination Shock’ Overplayed, Study Says

By Robert McSweeney

Solar geoengineering, or "solar radiation management" (SRM), is perhaps the most controversial of the different ways of limiting human-caused climate change.

A commonly voiced objection to the technique is the risk of "termination shock"—the rapid rebounding of global temperatures if SRM is deployed and then suddenly stopped.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Animals
King penguins on South Georgia. Mary Bomford / Flickr

Climate Change: 70% of King Penguins Could ‘Abruptly Relocate or Disappear’ by 2100

By Daisy Dunne

The arduous journey that king penguins must make in order to hunt fish to bring back to their young could become even longer as the climate warms, research suggests.

The study finds that future ocean warming in Antarctica could drive the penguins' primary hunting grounds further poleward—away from their favored breeding spots.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
Snowshoe hares. L.S. Mills / Jaco and Lindsey Barnard

Animals With White Winter Camouflage Could Struggle to Adapt to Climate Change

By Daisy Dunne

Animals that turn white in the winter to hide themselves in snowy landscapes could struggle to adapt to climate change, research suggests.

A new study finds that declining winter snowfall near the Arctic could have varying effects on the survival of eight mammal species that undergo a seasonal color molt from summer brown to winter white each year.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Business
www.routexl.com / Flickr

Small Drones Could Be Better for Climate Than Delivery Trucks, Says Study

By Zeke Hausfather

Automated, unmanned drones are poised to revolutionize the package delivery industry, with a number of companies already testing drone-based delivery methods.

Keep reading... Show less
Animals
Polar bear with a GPS-equipped video camera collar, on the sea ice of the Beaufort sea. Anthony Pagano / USGS

Polar Bears Could Be Struggling to Catch Enough Prey, Study Shows

By Daisy Dunne

Polar bears could be failing to hunt enough seals to meet their energy demands, new research suggests.

A study tracking the behavior of nine female bears from 2014 to 2016 over the Beaufort Sea found that some of the animals exerted so much energy during the hunting season that they lost up to 10 percent of their body mass in an 8-11 day period.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

The best of EcoWatch, right in your inbox. Sign up for our email newsletter!