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Scattered rainfall over dry season fields before harvest in the Sahel near Bahn Yatenga Burkina Faso Africa. The region is regularly affected by droughts. Getty Images

Solar Geoengineering Could ‘Fail to Prevent Damage to Crop Yields’

By Daisy Dunne

Releasing aerosols into the atmosphere in order to limit the rise in global temperature would not stave off damage to crop yields, a new study suggests.

Scientists have suggested that intentionally releasing aerosols into the atmosphere—a type of "solar geoengineering"—could help to limit global warming by reflecting away incoming sunlight in a similar way to a volcanic eruption.

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Moon with orange-colored troposphere band, the lowest and most dense portion of the earth's atmosphere. NASA

‘Powerful Evidence’ of Global Warming’s Effect on Seasons Found in Troposphere

By Daisy Dunne

Scientists studying the troposphere—the lowest level of the atmosphere—have found "powerful evidence" that climate change is altering seasonal temperatures.

A study published in Science finds that climate change has caused an increase in the difference between summer and winter temperatures across North America and Eurasia over the past four decades.

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Energy
Martin Pickard / Getty Images

Rapid Rise of UK Electric Vehicles Sees National Grid Double Its 2040 Forecast

By Simon Evans

There could be as many as 36m electric vehicles (EVs) on UK roads by 2040, double the number expected just a year ago.

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Climate
The Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve in Hillsboro, Oregon. born1945 / CC BY 2.0

Permafrost and Wetland Emissions Could Cut 1.5°C Carbon Budget ‘by Five Years’

By Robert McSweeney

Emissions of CO2 and methane from wetlands and thawing permafrost as the climate warms could cut the "carbon budget" for the Paris agreement temperature limits by around five years, a new study says.

These natural processes are "positive feedbacks"—so called because they release more greenhouse gases as global temperatures rise, thus reinforcing the warming. They have previously not been represented in carbon budget estimates as they are not included in most climate models, the researchers say.

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Climate
Strawberry dart frog, Dendrobatidae: Oophaga pumilio. Geoff Gallice / CC BY 2.0

Climate Change to Become ‘Greatest Pressure on Biodiversity’ by 2070

By Daisy Dunne

The combined effects of global warming and land-use change could cause the world's ecosystems to lose more than a third of their animal species by 2070, a new study finds.

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Video: How Beef Farmers Can Reduce Their Carbon Footprint

By Daisy Dunne and Tom Prater

The beef industry is currently responsible for 6 percent of annual global greenhouse gas emissions, making it as large a polluter as the construction sector.

Eating less meat is one way to cut beef emissions. However, scientists have also started to look at ways that farmers can reduce the carbon footprint of beef before it reaches the plate.

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Science
Downtowngal / CC BY-SA 3.0

Seven Key Things to Know About ‘Negative Emissions’

By Jan Minx, Dr. Sabine Fuss and Gregory Nemet

Despite the ambitious long-term climate goals of the Paris agreement, there remains a distinct lack of success at ushering in immediate and sustained reductions in global CO2 emissions.

This cognitive dissonance has seen the topic of "negative emissions"—also known as "carbon dioxide removal"—move into the limelight in climate science and policy discussions.

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Pexels

Tourism Responsible for 8% of Global Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Study Finds

By Daisy Dunne

Worldwide tourism accounted for 8 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions from 2009 to 2013, new research finds, making the sector a bigger polluter than the construction industry.

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Climate
Pixabay

Deforestation Has Driven Up Hottest Day Temperatures, Study Says

By Daisy Dunn

The average hottest day of the year in Europe, North America and Asia has been made significantly more intense as a result of deforestation since the start of the industrial revolution, a study finds.

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