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Community Solar Bill Puts Maryland at Forefront of Renewable Energy Policy

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Community Solar Bill Puts Maryland at Forefront of Renewable Energy Policy

This week, the Maryland General Assembly took a key step forward to allow more Marylanders than ever to access solar energy by passing community solar legislation. Community solar projects allow multiple people to subscribe to one solar energy project and offset a portion of their electric bill from the energy generated through a credit.

Community solar is important because approximately 80 percent of Marylanders are currently unable to choose solar energy, either because they have shaded roofs, are renters, can’t afford a full system or don’t have access to their roof. Photo credit: Earthjustice

The bills, HB 1087 and SB 398, create a three-year pilot program that will allow for the construction of community solar projects and will examine the impact of community solar in the state and best practices throughout the U.S.

Community solar is important because approximately 80 percent of Marylanders are currently unable to choose solar energy, either because they have shaded roofs, are renters, can’t afford a full system or don’t have access to their roof. By passing the legislation, the General Assembly created the potential for all Marylanders to benefit from solar energy.

In addition to creating access, this legislation also opens up more places for solar panels to be set up. Community solar projects can be sited in a variety of places, like the roof of an apartment building, a community center, a church or even in an open field.

If the governor signs the bill, Maryland will join 10 other states with a community solar policy. Such a law would keep Maryland at the forefront of clean energy policy. By transitioning away from burning fossil fuels to expanding clean energy, Maryland is taking major step toward lessening the impacts of climate change on our environment and on our health.

For every kilowatt of renewable energy we put on the grid, that's one less kilowatt of energy coming from coal or oil, polluting our air and increasing breathing illnesses like asthma and heart disease in addition to other health problems.

Basically, this is about prioritizing our health and a clean energy future for our children and making sure everyone benefits.

An additional goal is to make this community solar project permanent with additional legislation after learning what works best in Maryland. Earthjustice and our partners are working to boost renewable energy projects like this around the country.

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