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Community Food Activists Tell Their Stories

Food
Community Food Activists Tell Their Stories

It's easy to dismiss issues facing people we don't know and don't see. Out of sight, out of mind. And if we don't know any people grappling with hunger, that crisis can seem very abstract.

To personalize it and make it more real, WhyHunger, which supports community-based organizations that seek solutions to underlying causes of hunger and connect people with quality food, has launched its storytelling project Community Voices.

Read the stories of individual leaders and communities who are on the front lines shaping the movement to alleviate food insecurity and build food justice in America. Photo credit: WhyHunger

WhyHunger's mission is to "amplify the voices of the people working to regain control of their communities' food." WhyHunger says they believe that "telling one's story is not only an act of reclaiming in the face of the dominant food narrative of this country, but also an affirmation that the small acts of food sovereignty happening across the country add up to a powerful, vital collective."

Dozens of individuals, church groups, community groups and non-profits from across the country—California to Washington t0 Alabama to Minnesota to Pennsylvania—told their stories about what they're doing to provide access to good food for people in their communities.

The Jones Valley Teaching Farm is training residents to turn blighted areas of Birmingham, Alabama into productive urban farms. Photo credit: WhyHunger

These stories have been collected, as part of a collaboration between WhyHunger, USDA's Community Food Projects Competitive Grant Program, and writer and photographer, David Hanson.

Visit WhyHunger's new storytelling website and read the stories of individuals and communities who are on the front lines shaping the movement to alleviate food insecurity and build food justice in America.

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