Quantcast

Coloradans Give Gov. Hickenlooper and State Legislature an 'F' for Failing to Address Fracking

Energy

As Colorado lawmakers wrapped up their legislative session on Wednesday, members of Coloradans Against Fracking set up a mock classroom on the capitol steps and staged a performance to draw attention to the legislature’s failure to protect constituents from fracking.

The performance featured a disappointed teacher regaling two figures wearing “dunce” hats (one representing the Colorado legislature, the other Gov. Hickenlooper) over a shameful report card comprising “F” grades in every subject related to reining in the Colorado oil and gas industry.

The author, Sharon Carlisle, left, as "teacher," gives "students"—"Gov. Hickenlooper" and a "legislator"—an "F" for fracking. Photo credit: Sam Schabacker, Food & Water Watch

According to the state’s own data, during the past five months the legislature has been in session, Gov. Hickenlooper’s agency has permitted nearly 1,000 new wells in Colorado. Legislators have been sitting on their hands while Colorado’s families and futures get fracked.

Coloradans Against Fracking staged the “F is for Fracking. F is for Failure.” performance on the final day of the session to highlight that the governor’s and legislature’s inaction on fracking presents ongoing threats to Coloradans’ health, air, water, environment and safety from oil and gas development. After the Governor’s Blue Ribbon Task Force was deemed a failure by its own members, the Colorado legislature carried forward this trend by doing virtually nothing to abate the widespread fracking fiasco being literally drilled into Colorado.

“The Colorado Progressive Coalition is disappointed that the state legislature and Governor Hickenlooper have allowed gas & oil companies to continue to pollute and endanger the residents of low income, communities of color through continued fracking in Northern Colorado and northeast Denver,” said Mike Roque, executive director of Colorado Progressive Coalition.

After the performance, members of Coloradans Against Fracking waded through the waves of oil and gas lobbyists who inhabit the Colorado State Capitol (it’s estimated there are more oil and gas lobbyists than there are inspectors to monitor the state’s 53,000 fracking wells), to deliver the fracking failure report cards to the governor’s office. Last year, the oil and gas industry spent nearly $12 million to influence the outcome of elections, money “well spent” based on the result of this legislative session: no new oil and gas restrictions, no meaningful attempt to ban the fracking and no redress for the thousands of regular Coloradans whose health, safety and property is threatened by fracking.

“Our elected representatives—legislators and Governor Hickenlooper—should be standing up to the oil and gas companies to keep Colorado’s water and air clean and healthy for my generation and many more to come,” said youth leader Xiuhtezcatl Martinez of Earth Guardians. "They deserve an "F" for their lack of meaningful action to protect our future."

Coloradans are following a national trend of opposing fracking. Communities in Longmont, Fort Collins, Broomfield, Boulder and Lafayette have voted to place bans or moratoria on the dangerous industrial activity, and residents of Denver have launched an effort to stop fracking in that city and its watershed. Unfortunately, Gov. Hickenlooper continues his “Drill, Baby, Drill” stances—including supporting the export of fracked oil overseas (likely to China, Europe and India), a move that will create a further incentive for oil and gas companies to frack more wells next to homes and schools in Colorado.

"Due to the poor performance of our legislature and governor, our right to exercise local control over polluting industries remains undefended. The health and safety of Coloradans remains at risk from exposure to toxic emissions and industrial accidents. We need our elected officials to protect the rights of citizens, not the oil and gas industry," said Lauren Swain, 350 Denver fracking specialist.

“Governor Hickenlooper and our lawmakers need to stop drinking the fracking fluid and start protecting Coloradans,” said Sam Schabacker, western region director with Food & Water Watch.

Where is this all going? As the Presidential Race heats up, this issue will continue to be a defining one in Colorado politics. And as the war over these issues escalates within the Democratic Party—with the party elites embracing fracking while the rising grassroots wing calls for a ban—one thing is certain: precisely because Gov. Hickenlooper and the legislature failed to address the fracking fight, this fight is only going to heat up.

Coloradans Against Fracking is a broad-based coalition of organizations, businesses and individuals from all corners of Colorado working together for a statewide ban on hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas.

Sharon Carlisle is with Protect Our Loveland, a grassroots group working to protect that Colorado city from fracking.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Texas Passes Ban on Fracking Bans (Yes, You Read that Right)

8 States Dealing With Huge Increases in Fracking Earthquakes

Fracking Chemicals Found in Drinking Water, New Study Says

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Lucy Lambriex / DigitalVision / Getty Images

By Katey Davidson

Each year, an estimated 600 million people worldwide experience a foodborne illness.

While there are many causes, a major and preventable one is cross-contamination.

Read More
picture alliance / dpa / F. Rumpenhorst

By Arthur Sullivan

When was the last time you traveled by plane? Various researchers say as little as between 5 and 10 percent of the global population fly in a given year.

Read More
Sponsored
A Starbucks barista prepares a drink at a Starbucks Coffee Shop location in New York. Ramin Talaie / Corbis via Getty Images

By Cathy Cassata

Are you getting your fill of Starbucks' new Almondmilk Honey Flat White, Oatmilk Honey Latte, and Coconutmilk Latte, but wondering just how healthy they are?

Read More
Radiation warning sign at the Union Carbide uranium mill in Rifle, Colorado, in 1972. Credit: National Archives / Environmental Protection Agency, public domain

By Sharon Kelly

Back in April last year, the Trump administration's Environmental Protection Agency decided it was "not necessary" to update the rules for toxic waste from oil and gas wells. Torrents of wastewater flow daily from the nation's 1.5 million active oil and gas wells and the agency's own research has warned it may pose risks to the country's drinking water supplies.

Read More
Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg takes part in a "Friday for Future" youth demonstration in a street of Davos on Jan. 24, 2020 on the sideline of the World Economic Forum annual meeting. FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP via Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin pretended not to know who Greta Thunberg is, and then he told her to get a degree in economics before giving world leaders advice, as The Guardian reported.

Read More