Quantcast

Coldplay Delays Touring to Develop Environmentally ‘Beneficial’ Concerts

Business
Coldplay playing at Stade de France in Paris in July 2017. Raph_PH / Wikipedia / CC BY 2.0

Coldplay is releasing a new album on Friday, but the release will not be followed by a world tour.


The reason? The climate crisis.

"We're not touring this album," frontman Chris Martin told BBC News Thursday. "We're taking time over the next year or two, to work out how our tour can not only be sustainable [but] how can it be actively beneficial."

To mark the release of its new album Everyday Life, the band will play two concerts at sunrise and sunset in Jordan Friday, which will be streamed live on YouTube.

The band will also play one show at the Natural History Museum in London Nov. 25 and donate all the proceeds to environmental law charity ClientEarth, according to The Guardian.

Then, it's time to brainstorm. Martin told BBC News what the band hoped to achieve:

Our next tour will be the best possible version of a tour like that environmentally. We would be disappointed if it's not carbon neutral.

The hardest thing is the flying side of things. But, for example, our dream is to have a show with no single use plastic, to have it largely solar powered.

We've done a lot of big tours at this point. How do we turn it around so it's no so much taking as giving?

Live music emits 405,000 tonnes (approximately 446,000 U.S. tons) of greenhouse gases in the UK every year, according to figures reported by BBC News. It is estimated that U2 emitted the equivalent of a return trip to Mars when it took a large claw structure on tour in 2009.

"The more shows you have, the more environmental impact it has," Creative Artists Agency co-founder Emma Banks told BBC Music Wednesday. "We need to think more about how we can actually not create the problem in the first place."

Coldplay isn't the first band to try and reduce its touring footprint, BBC News pointed out. Radiohead has switched from traditional to LED spotlights, U2 has started recycling guitar strings and using hydrogen fuel cells and The 1975 has stopped selling merchandise and donates a UK pound to One Tree Planted for every ticket it sells.

U.S. artists are also working to green their acts. Billie Eilish has promised to make her tour, beginning next March, "as green as possible" by banning plastic straws, including recycling facilities and encouraging attendees to bring their own reusable water bottles, The Guardian reported. She will also travel with the "Billie Eilish Eco-Village," where fans can learn how they contribute to the climate crisis.

Pearl Jam has been calculating the emissions of its tours since 2003 and donating a percentage of the proceeds to environmental efforts, iNews reported. In 2018, the band offset 3,500 tons of carbon dioxide by investing in a carbon offset project in Alaska.

But BBC music reporter Mark Savage said there was something unique about Coldplay's commitment.

"Coldplay are going one step further. They don't just want to be carbon neutral, but to have tours that are 'actively beneficial' to the planet. And by putting their concerts on hold, they're giving up a huge pay day: The Head Full of Dream tour made $523m," Savage wrote. "The industry will be watching to see what solutions they come up with."

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Two tankers leaving the Tamborine Mountain after being held up for two hours by TM Extinction Rebellion on Dec. 6.

A school in Queensland, Australia sent a note home to parents asking them to send their children with extra water bottles since its water supply has run dry, according to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC).

Read More Show Less
European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen delivers a press statement on the European Green Deal at the EU headquarters in Brussels, Belgium on Dec. 11, 2019. Xinhua / Zheng Huansong via Getty Images

The European Commission introduced a plan to overhaul the bloc's economy to more sustainable, climate-conscious policies and infrastructure, with the goal of being carbon-neutral by 2050, according to CNBC.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Young activists shout slogans on stage after Greta Thunberg (not in the picture) took part in the plenary session during the COP25 Climate Conference on Dec. 11 in Madrid, Spain. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Young activists took over and occupied the main stage at the COP25 climate conference in Madrid, Spain Wednesday and demanded world leaders commit to far more ambitious action to address the ecological emergency.

Read More Show Less
A NASA image showing the ozone hole at its maximum extent for 2015. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

The Montreal Protocol, a 1987 international treaty prohibiting the production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) to save the ozone layer, was the first successful multilateral agreement to successfully slow the rate of global warming, according to new research. Now, experts argue that similar measures may lend hope to the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Example of starlings murmuration pictured in Scotland. Tanya Hart / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

Police in Wales are in the midst of an unusual investigation: the sudden death of more than 200 starlings.

Read More Show Less