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Colbert's Takedown of the Oregon Militia Men

Colbert's Takedown of the Oregon Militia Men

The Oregon militia men may be an even greater gift to late-night comedy than Donald Trump's candidacy—and that's really saying something. So, of course, Stephen Colbert took up the topic on his Tuesday night show. "I haven't seen this many angry bearded men since I referred to Blue Moon as a craft beer," Colbert quipped.

Colbert took viewers through the Bundy family tree, sometimes accompanied by a strum on the guitar. First there was Cliven, the renegade rancher who refused to pay his grazing fees, then expressed some dicey views on "the negro" and became a right-wing cause celebre. Now there's son Ammon in Oregon leading the charge. "I shutter to think what's in store for the Bundy grandchildren," Colbert said.

Only one problem, the militia men apparently forgot to pack snacks and, as Colbert pointed out, they took to Facebook to ask for "supplies or snacks or something."

That's when Colbert deployed the Oreo phone.

Watch here:

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