Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Coalition Slams Duke Energy for Funding Voter Suppression Laws and Dirty Energy Policies

Energy

Energy Action Coalition

A coalition of environmental, democratic reform and civil rights groups released an open letter to Duke Energy CEO Jim Rogers today, calling on him to stop funding voter suppression by dropping the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) before the Democratic National Conference.

The groups signing today’s letter and launching public petitions include: Energy Action Coalition, Greenpeace, Common Cause, CREDO Action, Progressive Change Campaign Committee, Public Citizen, Center for Media & Democracy, Friends of the Earth, Oil Change International, Southern Energy Network and the Checks & Balances Project.

“ALEC is not only responsible for drafting model state laws attacking renewable energy programs and climate policies, it is also intentionally crafting and supporting Voter ID bills and other legislation designed to suppress people from voting and participating in our democracy. We are concerned about this fundamental attack on our democracy and civil rights, and Duke Energy’s support for it” read the joint letter.

The groups are calling on Duke Energy to drop ALEC immediately. ALEC has pushed for voter suppression laws that could be responsible for disenfranchising upwards of 5 million people in 2012, and stood against renewable energy programs and policies to fight climate change. Publicly, Duke Energy has pledged to address climate change and implement clean energy programs, despite continuing their association with ALEC.

“It’s time for Jim Rogers and Duke Energy to put their money where their mouth is and drop ALEC. Duke Energy claims to care about climate change and clean energy, and yet they work with ALEC, an organization that fights tooth and nail for legislation that ignores the realities of climate change, and attacks clean energy programs,” said Maura Cowley, executive director of Energy Action Coalition. “On top of that, Duke is supporting ALEC’s flagrant attempts to strip people of their civil rights and the right to vote. We’re calling on Jim Rogers to cut Duke Energy’s ties to ALEC immediately.”

During the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, NC, Duke Energy’s hometown, the coalition plans to take further action to expose Duke Energy for supporting ALEC and funding voter suppression. Details will be released early next week.

Thirty-eight companies including General Electric, Walmart and Entergy Services have left ALEC in recent months due to ALEC’s role in supporting voter suppression and advancing the “Stand Your Ground Laws” that drew fire after the Trayvon Martin case.

Take a stand today and sign the CREDO Action petition telling Duke Energy to stop funding ALEC and its attempt to disenfranchise millions of voters.

Visit EcoWatch’s ENERGY page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Ministry of Trade issued a regulation revoking its decision from February to no longer require Indonesian timber companies to obtain export licenses that certify the wood comes from legal sources. BAY ISMOYO / AFP / Getty Images

By Hans Nicholas Jong

The Indonesian government has backed down from a decision to scrap its timber legality verification process for wood export, amid criticism from activists and the prospect of being shut out of the lucrative European market.

Read More Show Less

Viruses, pollution and warming ocean temperatures have plagued corals in recent years. The onslaught of abuse has caused mass bleaching events and threatened the long-term survival of many ocean species. While corals have little chance of surviving through a mass bleaching, a new study found that when corals turn a vibrant neon color, it's in a last-ditch effort to survive, as CBS News reported.

Read More Show Less
Harmful algal blooms, seen here at Ferril Lake in Denver, Colorado on June 30, 2016, are increasing in lakes and rivers across the U.S. Helen H. Richardson / The Denver Post / Getty Images

During summer in central New York, residents often enjoy a refreshing dip in the region's peaceful lakes.

But sometimes swimming is off-limits because of algae blooms that can make people sick.

Read More Show Less
A group of doctors prepared to treat coronavirus patients in Brazil. SILVIO AVILA / AFP via Getty Images

More than 40 million doctors and nurses are in, and they are prescribing a green recovery from the economic devastation caused by the new coronavirus.

Read More Show Less
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson (R) and Italy's Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte shake hands during an event to launch the United Nations' Climate Change conference, COP26, in central London on February 4, 2020. CHRIS J RATCLIFFE / POOL / AFP / Getty Images

The U.K. government has proposed delaying the annual international climate negotiations for a full year after its original date to November 2021 because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less
The Upcycled Food Association announced on May 19 that they define upcycled foods as ones that "use ingredients that otherwise would not have gone to human consumption, are procured and produced using verifiable supply chains, and have a positive impact on the environment." Minerva Studio / Getty Images

By Jared Kaufman

Upcycled food is now an officially defined term, which advocates say will encourage broader consumer and industry support for products that help reduce food waste. Upcycling—transforming ingredients that would have been wasted into edible food products—has been gaining ground in alternative food movements for several years but had never been officially defined.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A couple has a lunch under plexiglass protection designed by Christophe Gernigon at the H.A.N.D restaurant, on May 27, 2020 in Paris, as France eases lockdown measures taken to curb the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. ALAIN JOCARD / AFP via Getty Images

By Thomas A. Russo

As restaurants and bars reopen to the public, it's important to realize that eating out will increase your risk of exposure to the new coronavirus.

Read More Show Less