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5 Free Events to Check out This Climate Week NYC

Climate
Climate Week NYC

On Monday, Sept. 23, the Climate Group will kick off its 11th annual Climate Week NYC, a chance for governments, non-profits, businesses, communities and individuals to share possible solutions to the climate crisis while world leaders gather in the city for the UN Climate Action Summit.


Momentum for this year's event is fueled by the growing youth climate movement and the 2018 warning from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that we now have 11 years to nearly halve greenhouse gas emissions in order to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

"This year's Climate Week NYC 2019 has a keen focus on the climate decade ahead," Amy Davidsen, the executive director for North America at The Climate Group, told EcoWatch by email. "What must businesses, states, and cities do in the next ten years to avoid the dangerous impacts of climate change? What progress have we made? And how can we ensure that we get there to protect our future?"

To answer these questions, the biggest climate week in the world will host more than 250 events, ranging from dance, to film, to comedy to talks hosted by businesses and governments. You can find a full list of events here. But to help you out, EcoWatch has rounded up some free events open to the general public. Here are five things you can do during this year's Climate Week NYC.

Psychology & Our Planet. Psychologists Dr. Rupu Gupta and Dr. John Fraser will present on "conservation psychology," the study of what motivates and prevents people from protecting the environment, and how it can inform the work of nonprofits, businesses and governmental agencies. Organized by New Knowledge, this event includes the launch of their international book series and a wine reception. Donations recommend. Register at Eventbrite. Monday, September 23. 150 Broadway, 20th Floor, 6:30 pm.

Can Development and Conservation Co-Exist and How? This event invites community representatives and conservation experts to discuss how NYC can continue to develop in ways that encourage nature to thrive. The discussion will be moderated by NYC Council Member Justin Brannan and feature Annel Hernandez, associate director at the NYC Environmental Justice Alliance; Daniel Atha, director of conservation outreach at New York Botanical Garden; Brendan Pillar, deputy director of Waterfront and Open Space at the NYC Department of City Planning; and Bill Browning, environmental strategist and founding partner at Terrapin Bright Green. Register at Eventbrite. Tuesday, September 24. CUNY School of Law, 2 Court Square, 6:00 pm.

Sustainability Reporting in 2019. Come hear the results of annual research into the sustainability reporting of companies on the Dow 30 and other major international indices. EcoAct North America CEO William Theisen will lead a panel of experts and business leaders as they discuss how companies can best adapt to the climate crisis. Find out which are the most sustainable and what are the best things companies can do to be sustainable in 2019. Spaces are limited, so register at EventBrite and the organizers will contact you to confirm your place. Wednesday, September 25. Citco Gateway, 350 Park Avenue, 8:30 a.m.

Yoga in the Garden. Suffering from eco-anxiety? Come de-stress with an outdoor yoga program led by Designing Yoga Experiences, a practice led by three friends with experience in yoga, reiki and the healing power of sound. Don't worry if you're new to yoga: All levels are welcome. Please bring your own mat. Register at Eventbrite. Thursday, September 26. Naval Cemetery Landscape, 63 Williamsburg St. West, 6:30 p.m.

Stop Food Waste—NYC. According to Project Drawdown, reducing food waste is the third most effective thing we can do to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through 2050. This teaching market will gather vendors, speakers and partners to help you learn how you can waste less food. Tickets are limited, so register ASAP at Eventbrite. Friday, September 27. Javits Center, 429 11th Avenue, Event Space -1D, 12:00 p.m.

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