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Countdown: The Top Five Climate Videos of 2017

Climate

Did you know that more than 500 million people watch videos on Facebook every day? That's over half a billion people—a lot of eyes on a lot of important content.


We took a trip down Facebook memory lane to check out the videos Climate Reality supporters watched most. They're an incredible reminder of how far we've come in the past year—and of how much work we have left to do in the fight against climate change.

Take a look back at our top five viewed videos of 2017—and be sure to watch the ones you may have missed!

5. A … Wind Energy Island?

Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark have worked together on plans for an island that would collect energy from thousands of new wind turbines at sea. This blustery island would provide clean energy to a whopping 80 million people! To top it all off, the island will also have solar farms—taking advantage of the sun for even more renewable energy generation. Working together sure pays off!

4. A Taiwanese Skyscraper Full of Thousands of Trees

Twenty-one stories tall … 23,000 live plants … and the ability to absorb 130 tons of carbon dioxide per year. You have to watch the video to believe this incredibly sustainable skyscraper recently built in Taiwan—beautifully marrying design and sustainability.

With as many trees as New York City's Central Park, this groundbreaking new skyscraper is inspiring others in the built environment industry to follow suit with plans for forest cities—new developments that are also helping to fight climate change. Put our names on the waiting list for an apartment!

3. Norway Commits to Cutting Down Deforestation

Norway? More like No-Way! The Norwegian government is the first in the world to commit to no longer buying products that contribute to deforestation. By saying no to these harmful products and yes to firms with real sustainability policies, the country's government is not only saving crucial habitat for endangered species around the world, it could make a huge difference in the fight for a safer climate for all. Here's hoping other countries go the same way!

2. Tesla's Solar Panels (and Batteries) Help Power Hawaiian Island, Even at Night

Tesla is supplying the island of Kauai with thousands of solar panels and hundreds of batteries on a new farm that will power the island, even at night—eventually saving roughly 1.6 million gallons of diesel fuel a year. Add this to the list of ways Tesla is changing the game when it comes to energy—lighting up the world sustainably day and night.

1. These High-Efficiency Solar Panels Roll Out

Finally, for our most-viewed video of the year, we look to the UK-based renewable energy startup Renovagen. The innovative group has created rollaway solar panels that can be transported anywhere by vehicle—perfect for bringing instant power to disaster areas where they're needed most. It's no surprise our supporters loved this video.

Bonus Video!

On Thursday, Maryland will become the first state in the nation to implement a ban on foam takeout containers. guruXOOX / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Maryland will become the first state in the nation Thursday to implement a ban on foam takeout containers.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A sea turtle and tropical fish swim in Oahu, Hawaii. M.M. Sweet / Moment / Getty Images

By Ajit Niranjan

Leaders from across the world have promised to turn environmental degradation around and put nature on the path to recovery within a decade.

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Trending

Smoke from the Glass Fire rises from the hills on September 27, 2020 in Calistoga, California. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Just days after a new report detailed the "unequivocal and pervasive role" climate change plays in the increased frequency and intensity of wildfires, new fires burned 10,000 acres on Sunday as a "dome" of hot, dry air over Northern California created ideal fire conditions over the weekend.

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Sir David Attenborough speaks at the launch of the UK-hosted COP26 UN Climate Summit at the Science Museum on Feb. 4, 2020 in London, England. Jeremy Selwyn - WPA Pool / Getty Images

Sir David Attenborough wants to share a message about the climate crisis. And it looks like his fellow Earthlings are ready to listen.

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People walk down a flooded street as they evacuate their homes after the area was inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 27, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Kevin T. Smiley

When hurricanes and other extreme storms unleash downpours like Tropical Storm Beta has been doing in the South, the floodwater doesn't always stay within the government's flood risk zones.

New research suggests that nearly twice as many properties are at risk from a 100-year flood today than the Federal Emergency Management Agency's flood maps indicate.

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