Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Climate Research Distorted to Push Cooling Claims

Climate
Climate Research Distorted to Push Cooling Claims

Union of Concerned Scientists

Climate contrarians are again pushing “global cooling” claims, despite the fact that 2011 was the 35th year in a row in which global temperatures were above the historical average.

Today, they’re relying on a column by David Rose in the United Kingdom’s Daily Mail in which the author mischaracterizes research from the Met Office, the U.K.’s official weather and climate science research body.

According to the Met Office, they told Rose he was misrepresenting their research, but their comments failed to make it into his column.

Rose claims there has been “no warming since 1997.” But his analysis relies on cherry-picking a single year and counting forward from there. By that logic, any year that breaks the record for “warmest ever” can be used as the starting point to argue there has been cooling. The Met Office rightly pointed out that taking a longer, scientifically defensible time frame shows significant warming over the past several decades.

Further, Rose claims that the sun’s energy output will drop, saving us all from climate change. Alas, if only it were true.

According to the Met Office, the study Rose cites shows that changing solar output “would only most likely cause a reduction in global temperatures of 0.08 degrees Celsius” over the next 90 years. For those keeping score in the U.S., that translates to 0.114 degrees Fahrenheit. In other words, hardly a dent in the many degrees of warming expected under a business-as-usual emissions scenario.

This isn’t the first time Rose or the Daily Mail have gotten it wrong on climate science or ignored researchers who say their work was misrepresented.

Rose’s claim comes on the heels of the Wall Street Journal publishing cooling claims in a Jan. 27 op-ed, which the Union of Concerned Scientists also debunked.

We can expect more global cooling claims from media figures and politicians who are sympathetic to a do-nothing strategy for addressing climate change.

But we shouldn't believe them.

For more information, click here.

Former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is seen on October 19, 2015 in Madrid, Spain. Denis Doyle / Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden announced Monday that former Secretary of State John Kerry will sit on his National Security Council (NSC) as Special Presidential Envoy for Climate.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Susanna Pershern / Submerged Resources Center/ National Park Service / public domain

By Melissa Gaskill

Two decades ago scientists and volunteers along the Virginia coast started tossing seagrass seeds into barren seaside lagoons. Disease and an intense hurricane had wiped out the plants in the 1930s, and no nearby meadows could serve as a naturally dispersing source of seeds to bring them back.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Fridays for Future climate activists demonstrate in Bonn, Germany on Sept. 25, 2020. Roberto Pfeil / picture alliance via Getty Images

Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere hit a new record in 2019 and have continued climbing this year, despite lockdowns and other measures to curb the pandemic, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said on Monday, citing preliminary data.

Read More Show Less
The Argentine black-and-white tegu is an invasive species that can reach four-feet long. Mark Newman / Getty Images

These black-and-white lizards could be the punchline of a joke, except the situation is no laughing matter.

Read More Show Less
Smoke covers the skies over downtown Portland, Oregon, on Sept. 9, 2020. Diego Diaz / Icon Sportswire

By Isabella Garcia

September in Portland, Oregon, usually brings a slight chill to the air and an orange tinge to the leaves. This year, it brought smoke so thick it burned your throat and made your eyes strain to see more than 20 feet in front of you.

Read More Show Less