Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Climate Change Warning Labels on Gas Pumps?

Climate
Climate Change Warning Labels on Gas Pumps?

They say if you want to see what will be happening across the country in years to come, look at California. The state has been the leader on many issues, including ones relating to the environment.

SFEnvironment, a division of the city and county of San Francisco, has prepared a mock-up of a possible warning label to be placed on gas pumps. Image credit: SFEnvironment

If that's the case, you might some day be seeing warning label when you pull up to the pump to fill up that say "The contents of this pump are dangerous to the health of the climate."

Two cities in the Bay area are considering placing warning labels that essentially say just that on every gas pump within their limits. Berkeley will vote this week on whether to move forward on one of two proposals, and San Francisco is currently drafting such a law to be voted on. Although the laws are currently only drafts, a mock-up of the warning, written by the San Francisco city attorney's office says, "The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has determined that a typical passenger vehicle burning one gallon of fuel produces on the average 20 pounds of tailpipe carbon dioxide, which the EPA has determined is the primary greenhouse gas contributing to recent climate change."

Climate advocates hope the label will function like warning labels on cigarette packs, causing some people to think about the consequences of their usage.

“Right now, it’s normal and socially acceptable to burn fossil fuels in our society, and this is in contradiction to the science of global warming,” Jamie Brooks, a campaign manager for 350.org/Bay Area, told the San Francisco Chronicle. “What we’re not doing a very good job of is making the connection between our own personal use and global warming. The goal is to connect personal consumption with the problem. Who is responsible? Me.”

And Berkeley City Councilman Jamie Brooks, who sponsored the proposal, told the Chronicle, "Everybody wants to do something about global warming. The goal is it’ll make people stop and think about what they can do in the real world.”

Not surprisingly, the Western States Petroleum Association was less enthusiastic and called the labels "forced reproductions of the state’s and city’s policy opinions.”

Others, including Berkeley Councilman Gordon Wozniak, were simply skeptical about their effectiveness, saying they would "increase people’s guilt without giving them useful action."

“When you have to get somewhere and you need gas, what are you going to do? Leave the car there?” said Wozniak. “The decision comes when you buy the vehicle.”

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

California Electric Car Boom Accounts For 40 Percent of U.S. Sales

11-Year-Old Takes Vow of Silence Demanding Climate Action

How Much Money Can You Save By Switching to an Electric Car?

Protestors walk past an image of a Native American woman during a march to "Count Every Vote, Protect Every Person" after the U.S. presidential Election in Seattle, Washington on November 4. Jason Redmond / AFP / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A leading environmental advocacy group marked Native American Heritage Month on Wednesday by urging President-elect Joe Biden, Vice President-elect Kamala Kamala Harris, and the entire incoming administration "to honor Indigenous sovereignty and immediately halt the Keystone XL, Dakota Access, and Line 3 pipelines."

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Marilyn Angel Wynn / Getty Images

By Christina Gish Hill

Historians know that turkey and corn were part of the first Thanksgiving, when Wampanoag peoples shared a harvest meal with the pilgrims of Plymouth plantation in Massachusetts. And traditional Native American farming practices tell us that squash and beans likely were part of that 1621 dinner too.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Former U.S. Sec. of Energy Ernest Moniz listens during the National Clean Energy Summit 9.0 on October 13, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Isaac Brekken / Getty Images for National Clean Energy Summit

By Jake Johnson

Amid reports that oil industry-friendly former Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz remains under consideration to return to his old post in the incoming Biden administration, a diverse coalition of environmental groups is mobilizing for an "all-out push" to keep Moniz away from the White House and demand a cabinet willing to boldly confront the corporations responsible for the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less
Climate change can evoke intense feelings, but a conversational approach can help. Reed Kaestner / Getty Images

Anger, anxiety, overwhelm … climate change can evoke intense feelings.


Read More Show Less
A rare North Atlantic right whale is seen off Cape Cod Bay on April 14, 2019 near Provincetown, Massachusetts. Don Emmert / AFP / Getty Images

An extremely rare North Atlantic right whale calf was found dead off the North Carolina coast on Friday.

Read More Show Less