Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Trump Ally Lindsey Graham Says Climate Change Is Real and Trump Should Admit It

Politics
Senator Graham returns after playing a round of golf with Trump on Oct. 14, 2017 in Washington, DC. Ron Sachs – Pool / Getty Images

Lindsey Graham, the South Carolina Senate Republican who has been a close ally of Donald Trump, did not mince words last week on the climate crisis and what he thinks the president needs to do about it.


"I would encourage the President to look long and hard at the science and find a solution. I'm tired of playing defense on the environment," he said in a news conference alongside other GOP lawmakers who gathered to announce the formation of the Roosevelt Conservation Caucus, which will "embrace and promote constructive efforts to resolve conservation and environmental problems," as USA Today reported.

The group of House and Senate Republicans formed a list of priorities to address, including public land access, water quality and ocean pollution. The new caucus named themselves after Teddy Roosevelt, the ardent outdoorsman who founded the National Parks Service.

In the news conference, following the announcement, the climate crisis was a major topic since the president has been openly hostile to it and Republican congressmen have fallen in line. The president has called the climate crisis a hoax, withdrawn the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement, and opened up leases for greenhouse gas emitting fossil fuels.

"When nine out of 10 scientists say (carbon dioxide) emissions are creating a greenhouse gas effect and the planet is warming up, I believe the nine and not the one," Sen. Graham said, as South Carolina's Post and Courier reported.

Noting that Republicans seemed out of step with the general public and ignored the climate crisis at their own peril, Graham added, "We will win the solution debate, but the only way you're going to win the debate is admit we've got a problem. Let's talk about climate change from the innovative and not the regulatory approach."

This is not the first time Graham has differed with Trump on the climate crisis. Two years ago, he asked Trump to keep the U.S. in the Paris agreement. And, in April, he said, "Climate change is real, the science is sound and the solutions are available. If I told Trump that [special counsel Robert] Mueller thinks climate change is a hoax, we'd be well on our way," as CNN reported.

In announcing the Roosevelt Conservation Caucus, Graham showed a difference of opinion from the president, but he did not put forth any new ideas, nor did he back bold action. In fact, he used the moment to take a swipe at Democrats, calling the Green New Deal "crazy economics."

"Innovation is going to do more to solve this problem than any government mandate," he said. "We believe our friends on the other side care about the environment, but they care so much they're going to destroy the economy in the name of saving the environment," as The Hill reported.

The Republican group hinted that that plans for a carbon tax, climate-resilient infrastructure and increased funding of clean energy research will be some of their first proposals, according to the National Review. And Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, added that environmental responsibility means addressing ocean plastics, but she did not specify how, as the Post and Courier reported.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

These seven cookbooks by Black chefs have inspired the author's family. LightFieldStudios / Getty Images

By Zahida Sherman

Cooking has always intimidated me. As a child, I would anxiously peer into the kitchen as my mother prepared Christmas dinner for our family.

Read More Show Less
Hand sanitizer is offered to students during summer school sessions at Happy Day School in Monterey Park, California on July 9, 2020. FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP via Getty Images

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded its list of potentially toxic hand sanitizers to avoid because they could be contaminated with methanol.

Read More Show Less
Over the next couple of weeks, crews will fully remove the 125-foot-wide, 25-foot-tall dam, allowing the Middle Fork Nooksack to run free for the first time in 60 years. Ctyonahl / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Tara Lohan

The conclusion to decades of work to remove a dam on the Middle Fork Nooksack River east of Bellingham, Washington began with a bang yesterday as crews breached the dam with a carefully planned detonation. This explosive denouement is also a beginning.

Read More Show Less
A man observes a flooded stretch of Dock Street in Annapolis, Maryland on Jan. 25, 2010. Matt Rath / Chesapeake Bay Program

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said Tuesday that a trend of increased coastal flooding will continue to worsen as the climate crisis escalates.

Read More Show Less
A new tool called The Food Systems Dashboard aims to save decision makers time and energy by painting a complete picture of a country's food system. Photo courtesy of Dr. Jessica Fanzo and Dr. Rebecca McLaren

By Katie Howell

A new tool called The Food Systems Dashboard aims to save decision makers time and energy by painting a complete picture of a country's food system. Created by the Johns Hopkins' Alliance for a Healthier World, the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN), and the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the Dashboard compiles food systems data from over 35 sources and offers it as a public good.

Read More Show Less
White's seahorse, also called the Sydney seahorse, is native to the Pacific waters off Australia's east coast. Sylke Rohrlach / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

By Manuela Callari

It can grow to a maximum of six inches (16 centimeters), change color depending on mood and habitat, and, like all seahorses, the White's seahorse male gestates its young. But this tiny snouted fish is under threat.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Democratic Presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks at a "Build Back Better" Clean Energy event on July 14, 2020 at the Chase Center in Wilmington, Delaware. Joe Biden / Facebook

Presidential hopeful Joe Biden announced a $2 trillion plan Tuesday to boost American investment in clean energy and infrastructure.

Read More Show Less