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NOAA: Climate Change Fueled Deadly Louisiana Flooding

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NOAA: Climate Change Fueled Deadly Louisiana Flooding

Climate change made last month's historic deluge in Louisiana at least 40 percent more likely, a rapid attribution assessment by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) found.

Coast Guardsmen use a flat-bottom boat to assist residents during severe flooding around Baton Rouge on Aug. 14.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

Parts of Louisiana received 30 inches of rain in one week, leading to floods that killed 13 people and cost nearly $9 billion in damages.

"We are now actually able to objectively and quantifiably say 'yes, climate change contributed to this event.' It's unequivocal," said Climate Central chief scientist Heidi Cullen, who coordinated with NOAA and others for the study.

Denham Springs, Louisiana before and after the flooding. NOAA

For a deeper dive:

News: Washington Post, New York Times, AP, USA Today, Times-Picayune, Climate Central, LA Times, TIME, Popular Science, Mother Jones, Gizmodo, Mashable, Carbon Brief

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