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13 U.S. Cities Defy Trump by Posting Deleted Climate Data

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More than one dozen U.S. cities have banded together to post deleted climate change information and research from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) website that was notoriously scrubbed by the Trump administration.

In May, Chicago became the first city to host the deleted pages, and now other mayors are following in Rahm Emanuel's footsteps by creating their city's own "Climate Change is Real" website.


The "Climate Change is Real" website contains information on the basic science behind climate change, the ways weather is impacted from increased greenhouse gas emissions and actions the federal government has taken to reduce the impact.

Major cities including Atlanta, Boston, Houston, San Francisco and Seattle have joined the effort.

According to a statement from San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee's office, the pages were launched Sunday to ensure that the public has readily available access to research information the EPA has developed over the last many decades.

"Deleting federal webpages does not reset the scientific consensus that climate change is real," Lee said. "The American people are entitled to the publicly-funded EPA research on climate change. And while the federal government continues to undermine the progress we've made on climate change, cities are taking a stand. San Francisco will continue our fight against climate change by taking aggressive local actions to protect our citizens and planet.'

Other cities, academic institutions and organizations can post the same information to their own websites.

Here are the links to the 13 cities posting EPA climate change information:

City of Atlanta, Georgia

City of Boston, Massachusetts

City of Chicago, Illinois

City of Evanston, Illinois

City of Fayetteville, Arkansas

City of Houston, Texas

City of Milwaukee, Wisconsin

City of New Orleans, Louisiana

City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

City of Portland, Oregon

City of San Francisco, California

City of Seattle, Washington

City of St. Louis, Missouri

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