Quantcast

Climate Change Activist Parker Liautaud 100 Miles From World Record

Climate

Parker Liautaud trudged through some of the snowiest scenery on the planet for 11 hours, but his upbeat nature this morning would have been easy to confuse with somebody relaxing in Palo Alto, CA, where he was born.

The 19-year-old is on the 13th day of the 2013 Willis Resilience Expedition, which is quest to bring awareness to climate change while shooting for a world record for the fastest ski trip from the coast of Antarctica to the South Pole. Liautaud is about 100 miles away from his goal.

"A beautiful day outside, we had some great weather today," the Yale University sophomore said, according to the expedition website. "The team are doing great. Both [veteran explorer Doug Stoup] and me are in good spirits. It is just tiring but nothing unusual though.

"We had a good day today and made our distance. I am happy with it."

Doug Stoup and Parker Liautaud ski to the South Pole to promote climate change awareness.

The nearly 400-mile expedition began less than two weeks ago. Liautaud and Stoup skied 16.7 nautical miles in 11 hours Wednesday, which followed days in which they trekked 17 and 16 nautical miles. The duo traveled 100 nautical miles in less than a week.

"I guess today was our lucky day, I don’t know if we will be as lucky tomorrow but hopefully we will have some good weather," he said.

Liautaud hasn't discussed specific climate-related plans for his return to the U.S., but he began the trip by measuring and transmitting climate data at Leverett Glacier with the pilot model of the ColdFacts-3000BX weather station. He was also an ambassador for One Young World's Wake Up Call campaigned, which the group of young activists used to push for climate change policies in countries like Nepal and Algeria.

Hunger and simple tasks like zipping his coat are among the things that become more trying by the day, he told The Washington Post. However, optimism reigns supreme, even in frigid conditions, considering that Liautaud and Stroup could reach the South Pole by Christmas Day.

"We are now 99.98 nautical miles away and it is very exciting," Liautaud wrote. "I have been looking forward to this for a long time."

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Europe is bracing for a second heat wave in less than a month. TropicalTidbits.com

Europe is gearing up for another extreme heat wave that could set all-time records for several European countries.

Read More Show Less
Modern agricultural greenhouses in the Netherlands use LED lights to support plant growth. GAPS / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Kevin M. Folta

A nighttime arrival at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport flies you over the bright pink glow of vegetable production greenhouses. Growing crops under artificial light is gaining momentum, particularly in regions where produce prices can be high during seasons when sunlight is sparse.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
On Oct. 4, 2017, the Senate EPW Committee held a hearing on Wehrum's nomination. EPA / YouTube screenshot

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) former head of the Office of Air and Radiation who was instrumental in drafting policies that eased climate protection rules and pollution standards is under investigation by a federal watchdog for his dealings with the fossil fuel industry he was supposed to be regulating, according to the New York Times.

Read More Show Less

It's no secret that the Trump administration has championed fossil fuels and scoffed at renewable energy. But the Trump administration is trying to keep something secret: the climate crisis. That's according to a new analysis from the watchdog group Environmental Data and Governance Initiative (EDGI) who found that more than a quarter of the references to climate change on .gov websites vanished.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

New York is officially the first state in the union to ban cat declawing.

Read More Show Less
People walk in the Shaw neighborhood on July 20 in Washington, DC, where an excessive heat warning was in effect according to the NWS. Alex Wroblewski / Getty Images

By Adrienne Hollis

Climate change is a threat multiplier. This is a fact I know to be true. I also know that our most vulnerable populations, particularly environmental justice communities — people of color and/or low socioeconomic status — are suffering and will continue to suffer first and worst from the adverse effects of climate change. Case in point? Extreme heat.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Anne Danahy, MS, RDN

Coconut is the fruit of the coconut palm (Cocos nucifera).

Read More Show Less