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Climate Activists Gear Up to Lead Large Climate March in Lima, Peru

Climate
Climate Activists Gear Up to Lead Large Climate March in Lima, Peru

We are broadcasting from the United Nations climate summit in Lima, Peru, where high-level talks have just gotten under way.

Climate Activists Gear Up to Lead Large Climate March in Lima, Peru

As we end today's show, protesters are beginning to gather in downtown Lima for what organizers hope will be the largest climate march in the history of South America. On Tuesday, Democracy Now! visited Casa de Convergencia TierrActiva, a house that has become a key organizing hub ahead of the march. Here are some of the voices from the convergence space.

Brazilian Indigenous Leader: Carbon Trading Scheme "REDD" is a False Solution to Climate Change

The controversial carbon trading scheme known as REDD, or Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, has set off protests not only in Africa, but also in South America, especially in the Amazon region. We speak to Chief Ninawa Huni Kui, president of the Federation of the Huni Kui, an indigenous group in Brazil. He has traveled to the U.N. Climate Summit in Lima to voice his opposition to REDD.

Democracy Now! Interviews Nigerian Environmental Activist Nnimmo Bassey about U.N. Climate Talks

On Tuesday, Bolivian President Evo Morales called on delegates to include the wisdom of indigenous people in the global agreement to address climate change and criticized the summit for failing to address capitalism as the root of the crisis. We discuss the state of the climate talks with Nnimmo Bassey, a Nigerian environmental activist, director of Health of Mother Earth Foundation, and author of "To Cook a Continent: Destructive Extraction and Climate Crisis in Africa." Bassey says the carbon trading included in the draft agreement could increase deforestation, displace farmers and contribute to the food crisis in Africa.

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