Quantcast

'Climatarian' Makes New York Times List of Top New Food Words for 2015

Climate

The New York Times published its list of the top new food words for 2015. Words and phrases that made this year's list range from "beer o'clock," one's personal assessment of the right time of day to start drinking, to "hangry," the state of being so hungry that you become angry or irritable.

But, the one word most relevant to the environmentally conscious is "climatarian." The New York Times defines it as "a diet whose primary goal is to reverse climate change. This includes eating locally produced food (to reduce energy spent in transportation), choosing pork and poultry instead of beef and lamb (to limit gas emissions) and using every part of ingredients (apple cores, cheese rinds, etc.) to limit food waste."

The word gained popularity this year in part because it was promoted by a group called Climates (yes, the organization's official name is formally half-bold). They encourage people to "go climatarian" and save a tonne (1.1 short tons) of carbon dioxide equivalent, which includes carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and other greenhouse gases.

The evidence supporting a climatarian diet is abundant. Several reports within the past year, including one from the UK think tank Chatham House, have found that eating less meat and dairy is essential to curbing climate change.

And a carbon-conscious diet is not only good for the planet, but is healthy for people, too.

The health benefits of eating less meat have been touted by nutritionist Marion Nestle, former Daily Show host Jon Stewart, singer Beyoncé and director James Cameron. After retiring as the host of the Daily Show in August, Stewart and with his wife turned their New Jersey farm into an official Farm Sanctuary site. Beyoncé launchedvegan meal delivery service, 22 Days Nutrition. And James Cameron helped launch America's first vegan school.

Meat, especially processed meat, is looking less and less appetizing, especially since the release of the World Health Organization's report that found the consumption of processed meat is linked to an increase in cancer risk.

While #climatarian has gained some traction on Twitter, it remains to be seen if the word is here to stay.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Find Out if Your Eggs Are Truly Organic and Support Local Farms

Europe’s Dirty Little Secret: Moroccan Slaves and a ‘Sea of Plastic’

Aziz Ansari Blasts Factory Farming for Cruelty to Chickens

$300 Underground Greenhouse Grows Your Food Year-Round

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A new report spotlights a U.N. estimate that at least 275 million people rely on healthy coral reefs. A sea turtle near the Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef is seen above. THE OCEAN AGENCY / XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY

By Jessica Corbett

In a new report about how the world's coral reefs face "the combined threats of climate change, pollution, and overfishing" — endangering the future of marine biodiversity — a London-based nonprofit calls for greater global efforts to end the climate crisis and ensure the survival of these vital underwater ecosystems.

Read More
Half of the extracted resources used were sand, clay, gravel and cement, seen above, for building, along with the other minerals that produce fertilizer. Cavan Images / Cavan / Getty Images

The world is using up more and more resources and global recycling is falling. That's the grim takeaway from a new report by the Circle Economy think tank, which found that the world used up more than 110 billion tons, or 100.6 billion metric tons, of natural resources, as Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported.

Read More
Sponsored

By Gero Rueter

Heating with coal, oil and natural gas accounts for around a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions. But that's something we can change, says Wolfgang Feist, founder of the Passive House Institute in the western German city of Darmstadt.

Read More
Researchers estimate that 142,000 people died due to drug use in 2016. Markus Spiske / Unsplash

By George Citroner

  • Recent research finds that official government figures may be underestimating drug deaths by half.
  • Researchers estimate that 142,000 people died due to drug use in 2016.
  • Drug use decreases life expectancy after age 15 by 1.4 years for men and by just under 1 year for women, on average.

Government records may be severely underreporting how many Americans die from drug use, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Georgetown University.

Read More
Water coolers in front of shut-off water fountains at Center School in Stow, MA on Sept. 4, 2019 after elevated levels of PFAS were found in the water. David L. Ryan / The Boston Globe via Getty Images

In a new nationwide assessment of drinking water systems, the Environmental Working Group found that toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS are far more prevalent than previously thought.

Read More